MSL YEAR 0 MARS WEATHER DATA AND DATA REVISIONS

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Tables 1 & 2 summarize the new REMS data. (Updated on 3/2/2017 after NASA dropped all low UV values)

OVERVIEW. Martian weather and blue sky color seen simply do not match the low (near vacuum) Martian air pressure advocated by NASA (6.1 millbars/610 Hectopascals) at areoid, the Martian equivalent of sea level. There are abundant dust devils, even on a mountain named Arsia Mons to altitudes of 17 km above areoid, spiral storms with 10 km eye-walls above Arsia Mons. Dust storm opacity can cause darkness at noon. We have seen snow fall at the Phoenix lander, excessive aerobraking, stratus clouds 13 km above areoid, and nighttime temperature drops that are comparible to what is seen in Montana. Massive sand dunes are moving and rover tracks are filling in with sand, without adequate winds seen to explain the sand movement with such low air pressure and density. Vikings 1 and 2 plus Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) showed consistent timing of daily pressure spikes. A close analysis of the MSL Year 1 meteorological data shown on Table 1 backs our assertion that NASA is seriously understating Martian air pressure. This could be due to pressure transducer design flaws like tiny unchangeable dust filters in the Tavis sensors used for Viking 1, Viking 2 and Mars Pathfinder and again in the Vaisala sensors for Phoenix and MSL. These filters likely clog on landing.  The decision to send sensors with inadequate pressure ranges like the 11.5 millibar/1150 Hectopascal limit on MSL was also unwise for reasons we discuss below in conjunction with a mean pressure of 11.49 mbar first reported for Sol 370.

THE PEOPLE FACTOR - UNDERSTANDING MARS DATA OFTEN REQUIRES KNOWING THE PEOPLE BEHIND IT. We have interviewed many of them. Some are mentioned in this article, more are discussed in our Basic Report. While human error may explain the ludicrous pressures reported, there is also a possibility of deliberate disinformation. An example of such disinformation would be keeping the designer of the Vaisala sensor, Henriq Kahanpää of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), from being told about nearby heat sources and even the number of air access tubes and dust filters used in conjunction with his sensor. NASA used International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) as an excuse but if they didn't want to give design critical information to a foreigner they should have hired an American to build the sensor.  That, of course, assumes that they were interested in learning the truth. The overall problems are discussed in Sections 2.2 to 2.4 of our report and in our PowerPoints.

MARS CORRECT: CRITIQUE OF ALL NASA MARS WEATHER DATA WITH EMPHASIS ON PRESSURE

Basic Report for MARS CORRECT: Critique of All NASA Mars Weather Data Updated February 23, 2017.

POWERPOINT TO SUPPORT THE BASIC REPORT

Updated January 29, 2017.

UNDERSTANDING TABLE 1 AND IMPLICATIONS OF ITS DATA. Table 1 below shows how the weather at MSL varied for a Martian year between landing on August 6, 2012 (Sol 1) and Sol 669 on June 24, 2014.  In several cases the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Team and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as Ashima Research (who worked for JPL) altered their published data after directly hearing from our Mars Correct Team. This is documented in this article with printscreens captured before and after our objections to their data. Alterations included the deletion of all wind data on May 11, 2013, a day after JPL Public Relations Representative Guy Webster admitted to us that all wind speeds were wrong due to damage suffered to Weather Boom 1 on landing.  Initially sunrise/sunset times for Gale Crater, Mars were only listed on reports by Ashima Research, and they were all wrong because they all showed a never changing sunrise at 6 am and sunset at 5 pm. The Martian day is never that short so close to the equator (4.59° South). Approximate day length times were first calculated by Barry Roffman in our Mars Correct Team and then precisely calculated by David A. Roffman. Relative humidity is always listed on REMS reports as N/A. We believe that relative humidity is at least in part listed as N/A because it would be affected by air pressure and NASA has that wrong, however we discuss it in detail elsewhere on this site. On Table 1 column subjects and color codings are as follows:

Column A (Sol). The Martian day is about 39 minutes longer than the terrestrial day. Occasionally (at MSL Sols 34, 106, 179, 215, 252, 267, 288, 328, etc.) the REMS reports indicated 2 days forward but only 1 sol forward.

Columns B is solar longitude (Ls). MSL is in the Southern Hemisphere on Mars. The landing was at Ls 150 in winter. Ls 180 begins the spring there.  Ls 270 starts summer, Ls 0 starts the fall. Ls 90 starts the winter.

Column C shows the date on Earth.

Columns D shows the original pressure reported by the REMS Team. The first pressure sent back was 705 Pascals which is 7.05 hPa or 7.05 millibars. No pressure this low was ever seen again and the REMS Team/JPL later deleted it and all other weather data for Sol 1. The next pressure given was on Sol 9. At 718 Pa it was also lower than any pressure seen again, and once again all data for that day was changed to Not Available. Of note are pressures for Sol 192 (940 Pa), Sol 200 (937 Pa) which were higher than anything they accepted after their revisions (shown in Column E). Both sol pressures were altered to N/A. Also very noteworthy were the original pressures for Sols 26 to 30 between September 1 and 5, 2012. All were between 742 and 747 hectopascals (hPa) which translates to 74,200 Pa up to 74,700 Pa. These pressures are equivalent to what would be seen on Earth at ski resorts in Colorado. The pressures were revised down by a factor 100 as is shown in Column E. So 747 hPa became 747 Pa, which is like replacing dollars with the same number of cents. While JPL may argue that the Earth-like pressures were due to typographical errors, the weather seen on Mars matches these pressures rather than the pressures given in Column E. As mentioned above Henriq Kahanpää was the designer of the pressure sensor for MSL. We know this guy. In response to an e-mail from us on December 15, 2009 he wrote back "“Your nose smelled also a real issue. The fact that we at FMI did not know how our sensor was mounted in the spacecraft and how many filters there were shows that the exchange of information between NASA and the foreign subcontractors did not work optimally in this mission!” Why mention that here? Because Kahanpää was on the REMS Team. We find it hard to believe that he could for essentially for a week accidentally report to the world pressures that were 100 times too high. Given the dissatisfaction that he expressed about how his sensor was being used by NASA in 2009, we think it's plausible that in protest he deliberately published the higher figure because that is what is there on Mars. However, a transducer with a top measurable pressure of 11.5 mbar could not measure a pressure of 747 mbar. To measure that a substitution would have to have taken place with or without his assistance. While we cannot prove that an alternate sensor was available to fly on MSL, we can prove that the same CAD for Mars Pathfinder included two identical appearing pressure sensors - one with a top measurable pressure of 12 mbar (Tavis Dash Number 2) while the other on the CAD (Tavis Dash Number 1) had a top measurable pressure of 1,034 mbar. See Section 2.2 of our Report.

Further, the original data shown for Sols 369 to 371, and in particular for Sol 370 shows the mindset of JPL.  It also reflects a specific response to a challenge that we phoned into JPL PR man Guy Webster. Sol 369 shows 865 Pa. For Sol 370 the mean pressure was up to 1149 Pa (11.49 mbar) which is higher than any pressure recorded by any lander and not altered for Mars. The following day the pressure was back at 865 Pa, exactly what it was two Martian days earlier. The problem that we brought to JPL's attention was that the pressure measured was constrained by the fact that the sensor could not measure more than 11.5 mbar (1150 Pa), and that amount is likely just a rounded off figure estimate. So to have an average pressure of 1149 Pa means that the pressure had to be higher than the maximum pressure that could be measured by the Vaisala pressures sensor. About 7 months after I bought up this issue the REMS Team and JPL simply eliminating the problem by altering the pressure for Sol 370 back down to 865 Pa to match what was given the day before and after the anomaly. In short, they lied. See Figure 1 for documentation of this allegation. As for the fact that NASA advertised sending a pressure sensor that we believed was inadequate, we specifically personally warned Dr. Ashwin Vasavada (MSL Project Scientist) just before he spoke at the International Mars Society Convention in Dallas, Texas on the night of August 6, 2011. We warned him again about it by phone in October, 2011. He indicated that he understood why we thought the Vaisala sensor was flawed, but it was evident that he was under pressure to launch the mission by December, 2011 lest they be required to wait another 2 years to get Mars back in position again. It was also evident that the mission priority was geology rather than meteorology.

Column E shows revised pressures given. The first pressure listed is for Sol 10 and it was 739 Pa. The highest pressure after revisions was 925 Pa (9.25 mbar) on Sols 170 and 171. This was also exactly the highest pressure recorded in MSL Year 2 (Sol 846 at Ls 257). We noticed a pattern in which after we highlighted in yellow sols for MSL Year 2 that had greater than a 7 Pa variance from Year 1, JPL often altered the pressure for the Year 2 date to under 7 mbar or less. During MSL Year 2 from MSL Sol 670 through 1,065 there were only 34 sols in which the pressure for the same Ls position varied by more than 7 Pa (.07 mbar) from what it was in Year 1. On Table 1 below for Year 1 surviving changes for 10 Pa or more in pressure from one sol to the next or from the original pressure to the revised pressure are highlighted in lavender. There seemed to be a deliberate policy of publishing pressures that were in line with Viking 1 and 2 data (see Figure 5 found below Tables 1 and 2). We believe that what is seen is more likely the result of political rather than actual pressure.

Column F shows the maximum air temperature now given, often after the REMS Team/JPL revised temperatures that were above the freezing point of water (on Earth) to temperatures below freezing on Earth. With respect to the freezing point, from 0° C at 1 atm pressure it will increase up to 0.01° C at 0.006 atm (which is about the average pressure on Mars as given by NASA). This is the triple point of water. At pressures below this, water will never be liquid. It will change directly between solid and gas phase (sublimation). The temperature for this phase change, the sublimation point, will decrease as the pressure is further decreased

Column G shows the revised maximum air temperatures. There seems to be a very disturbing effort was made by the REMS Team and JPL to alter almost all previous air temperatures that were above freezing to now read below freezing. We think this is more evidence of a deliberate effort made to paint Mars in a way that is less likely to procure funding for manned flight there. We used to assume that at least some of the pressure data was faked, but not the temperature data. Now we know that data manipulation, alteration, and manufacture has crept into all areas of MSL data.

Column H shows minimum air temperature.

Column I shows the air temperature range for each sol. On Earth temperatures can vary by 40 °C in deserts. In column I where the range is 58 °C ot 59 °C green background coloring points that out. However , where temperature ranges are 57 °C or less those sols are shown with blue backgrounds and white letters.

  • The National Park Service claims that the world record in a diurnal temperature variation is 102 °F (57 °C) (from 46 °F (8 °C) to −56 °F (−49 °C)) in Browning, Montana (elevation 4,377 feet/1,334 meters) on January 23 to 24, 1916.
  • However the Montana Department of Environmental Quality claims that Loma, Montana on January 15, 1972 (elevation 2,575 feet/785 meters) had a variation of 103 °F (57 °C) (from −54 °F (−48 °C) to 49 °F (9 °C)) in 1972 (see Andrew H. Horvitz, et al. A National Temperature Record at Loma, Montana, National Weather Service, 2002. Accessed 2008-11-02). So there were two days in the State of Montana where the temperature changed by 57 °C. Column I belows shows that in the 669 sols of MSL being on Mars (MSL Year 1) there were 88 sols in which the temperature dropped by 57 °C or less from day to night. That's 13.15% of the sols. These numbers tend to support Earth-like pressure.
  • While the two 57 °C diurnal temperature variations in Montana occurred in the winter, of the eighty-eight 57 °C or less diurnal temperature variations at Gale Crate, Mars 32 were in the winter, 2 were in spring, 6 were in summer and 48 were in autumn.

Column J shows temperature range divided by 40. This allows us to compare terrestrial deserts with Gale Crater, Mars. How much cooling occurs at night is related to the density of the atmosphere. Here we see the ratio of cooling on a Mars sol to the typical 40 °C cooling figure for Earth's deserts shown with a green background when that ratio is under 1.5. Obviously if we alter the devisor from 40 °C  to 57 °C then 88 of the ratios will be altered to 1 or less than 1, meaning that Martian air pressure is indeed likely much higher than NASA claims.

Column K shows maximum ground temperature. As with terrestrial deserts, the ground on Mars heats more during the day than the air does, and it cools more at night than the air does. In Column K when the maximum ground temperature is given by REMS is above 0°C it is shown with red background or more.

Column L shows the original minimum ground temperature. When it is -90 °C or colder the background is in blue. Around Sol 443 the REMS Team/JPL elected to warm almost all these temperatures by 4 or 5 °C. The revised temperatures are in Column M. The ground temperatures are not very precise. Ground temperatures were supposed to be recorded with a thermopile on Boom 1 (which suffered some damage on landing). Assuming that Guy Webster (JPL P.R.) was correct when he told me that only the wind sensor was damaged on Boom1, the ground temperature sensor was supposed to view the Martian surface to the side of the rover through a filter with a passband of 8 to 14 microns. The requirement was to measure ground brightness temperature over the range from 150 to 300 K with a resolution of 2 K and an accuracy of 10 K. REMS has made a number of changes to ground temperatures they post since they began doing so in 2013.

Column M shows the revised minimum ground temperature. After what looks close to search/replace efforts for the bulk of the first 443 days and a hiatus in data until Sol 486 with almost all original temperatures dropped by 4 or 5 °C, the remaining temperatures in Column M essentially are the same as those on Column L. 

Column N shows the increase in temperature from the mast 1.5 meters above the ground down to the ground during the daylight hours. In column N anytime there is an increase in temperature of 20 °C or more this in indicated with an orange background. All ground temperatures were left off all the daily weather reports until July, 2013. In the first 669 sols of MSL (revised) weather reports there were 72 sols in which the value of temperature increases in column M was at least 20 °C.

Column O shows the decrease in temperature from the ground to the air at nights. If the data were valid we would expect similar heating or cooling to occur over the set distance from ground to boom. A quick survey of the data immediately shows that this was not found. In column N we see a variation in heating between 0 °C and over 30 °C. For nighttime cooling any variation from 11°C to 19°C is shown with a medium blue background. More than that is shown with a dark blue background. For night time cooling any variation over 10 °C is shown with a blue background.

Column P shows the ultraviolet radiation seen by MSL. All sols in MSL Year 1 have opacity listed as “sunny” which seems dubious. This appears to be true for MSL Year 2 also (at least up to Sol 1,065 on August 5, 2015). The international guidelines for UVI reporting established by the World Health Organization (WHO), has 11 numerical levels while only four levels are seen on the REMS reports (extreme was never seen).  Low means low danger from the sun's UV rays for the average person, Moderate is moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure, High means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed, 8 to 10: Very High means that unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly.  Initially during MSL Year 1 low UV was currently indicated for Sols 609, 619. During MSL Year 2 there was low UV on Sols 838, 839, 840, 841, 843,844, 800. 851, 853, 854, 855, 939, 1006, 1007, 1008, 1026 (1,021 was listed as low initially, then changed to high). However, by February, 2016 NASA decided to drop all UV values, changing them either to medium, high, or not avaliable. These changes are highlighted with white letters on a red background. The changes were made after NASA accessed our weather data spreadsheets and read our concerns. IP addresses and times of access by them are avaiable upon request from appropriate U.S. Government authorities.

       NOTE: There is much more to this article after the 669 sols of weather data in the Table below. Please scan down the page to see it.

Figure 1 above - Changing Martian weather data from the REMS Team.. Figure 2 below shows a major change to Sol 370's pressure that was made by JPL after we published the fact that the MSL's pressure sensor could not measure over 1150 Pa (11.5 mbar).

 

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

SOL

~Ls

Earth Date

Original Pressure Pa

Revised Pressure Pa

Maximum Air Temp. °C

Original Maximum Air Temp. °C

Minimum Air Temp. °C

Air Temp Range

°C

Air Temp Range

°C/40

Max Ground Temp

°C

Original Min. Ground Temp

°C

Revised Min. Ground Temp °C

Daytime  Increase in Temp °C  Air to Ground

Nighttime  Decrease in Temp °C  Ground to Air

UV

Comments

1

150

8/7/2012

705

N/A

-6

 

-11

5

 

21

-27

 N/A

27

-16

 VH

 

2

151

8/8/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

 

3

152

8/9/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

4

152

8/10/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

5

153

8/11/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

6

153

8/12/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

7

154

8/13/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

8

155

8/14/2012

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

9

155

8/15/2012

There was a 718

N/A

-13

 

-65

52

1.3

17

-75

N/A 

30

-10

N/A 

 

10

155

8/16/2012

N/A

739

-16

 

-75

59

1.475

8

-88

-83 

24

-13

 VH 

 

11

156

8/17/2012

N/A

740

-11

 

-76

65

1.625

9

-88

-83

20

-12

 VH  

 

12

156

8/18/2012

N/A

741

-18

 

-76

58

1.45

8

-87

 -82

26

-11

 VH  

 

13

157

8/19/2012

N/A

732

-15

 

-74

59

1.475

8

-85

 -80

23

-11

 VH  

Minimum pressure same as Ls 147

14

157

8/20/2012

N/A

740

-16

 

-74

58

1.45

8

-87

 -82

24

-13

 VH  

 

15

158

8/21/2012

N/A

740

-15

 

-78

63

1.575

8

-86

 -82

23

-8

 VH  

 

16

158

8/22/2012

730

740

0

-1

-77

77

1.925

9

-86

 -81

9

-9

 VH  

 

17

159

8/23/2012

740

742

-4

0

-76

72

1.8

6

-85

 -81

10

-9

 VH  

 

18

160

8/24/2012

761

N/A

-21

 

-73

52

1.3

2

-85

 N/A

23

-12

N/A 

INTERIM PRESSURE 761 Pa

19

160

8/25/2012

719

(There was a 781 Pa pressure first published)

N/A

-3

-18

-61

58

1.45

7

-71

 N/A

10

-10

N/A 

INTERIM PRESSURE 719 Pa

20

161

8/26/2012

727

N/A

-1

 

-68

67

1.675

8

-81

 N/A

9

-13

N/A 

INTERIM PRESSURE 727 Pa

21

161

8/27/2012

790

741

-3

0

-74

71

1.775

7

-86

 -81

10

-12

 VH  

 

22

162

8/28/2012

740

742

-6

3

-74

68

1.7

8

-86

 -81

14

-12

 VH  

 

23

162

8/29/2012

740

741

-16

0

-75

59

1.475

8

-87

 -81

24

-12 

 VH  

 

24

163

8/30/2012

740

742

-7

0

-75

68

1.7

6

-88

 -83

13

-13

 VH  

 

25

163

8/31/2012

N/A

743

-11

 

-75

64

1.6

6

-84

 -79

17

-9

 VH  

 

26

164

9/1/2012

74200

745

-14

2

-76

62

1.55

5

-87

 -83

19

-11

 VH  

Sep 1 to 5, pressure units were hPa, then altered to Pa.

27

164

9/2/2012

74300

743

-15

-1

-75

60

1.5

5

-83

 -79

20

-8

 VH  

 

28

165

9/3/2012

74500

745

-15

-6

-81

66

1.65

5

-84

 -79

20

-3

 VH  

 

29

166

9/4/2012

74700

747

-2

-7

-77

75

1.875

6

-83

 -78

8

-6

 VH  

 

30

166

9/5/2012

74700

747

-3

-2

-74

71

1.775

6

-83

 -80

9

-9

 VH  

See Figure 2 for Table 1 below.

31

167

9/6/2012

747

745

-23

-3

-74

51

1.275

1

-84

=80

24

-10

 VH  

 

32

167

9/7/2012

742

N/A

-2

 

-62

60

1.5

6

-72

 N/A

8

-10

N/A 

INTERIM PRESSURE 726

33

168

9/8/2012

748

748

-2

 

-73

71

1.775

5

-84

 -80

7

-11

 VH  

 

34

168

9/10/2012

748

748

1

0

-94

95

2.375

5

-83

 -78

4

11

 VH  

 

35

169

9/11/2012

799

749

-1

-2

-73

72

1.8

6

-83

 -78

7

-10

 VH  

 

36

169

9/12/2012

744

750

-1

5

-73

72

1.8

6

-82

 -78

7

-9

 VH  

 

37

170

9/13/2012

752

750

0

0

-73

73

1.825

6

-83

 -78

6

-10

 VH  

 

38

171

9/14/2012

748

750

-13

-3

-73

60

1.5

7

-82

 -78

20

-9

 VH  

 

39

171

9/15/2012

757

751

-8

-3

-75

67

1.675

7

-83

 -79

15

-8

 VH  

 

40

172

9/16/2012

804

753

-12

2

-75

63

1.575

7

-83

 -79

19

-8

 VH  

 

41

172

9/17/2012

752

753

-12

2

-75

63

1.575

7

-84

 -79

19

-9

 VH  

 

42

173

9/18/2012

755

754

-7

5

          -75

68

1.7

7

-85

 -80

14

-10

 VH  

 

43

173

9/19/2012

756

756

-12

3

-74

62

1.55

9

-84

 -80

21

-10

 VH  

 

44

174

9/20/2012

754

757

-10

4

-75

65

1.625

13

-91

 -86

23

-16

 VH  

 

45

175

9/21/2012

757

758

-9

3

-74

65

1.625

11

-92

 -87

20

-18

 VH  

 

46

175

9/22/2012

759

758

-12

4

-74

62

1.55

13

-88

-83

25

-14

 VH  

 

47

176

9/23/2012

758

758

-9

6

-75

66

1.65

13

-88

-83

22

-13

 VH  

 

48

176

9/24/2012

758

759

0

4

-75

75

1.875

11

-89

 -84

11

-14

 VH  

 

49

177

9/25/2012

763

761

-10

4

-74

64

1.6

9

-86

 -81

19

-12

 VH  

 

50

177

9/26/2012

760

761

-10

0

-72

62

1.55

11

-80

 -76

21

-8

 VH  

 

51

178

9/27/2012

766

762

-7

3

-76

69

1.725

13

-88

 -83

20

-12

 VH  

 

52

179

9/28/2012

765

762

-7

7

-74

67

1.675

12

-89

 -84

19

-15

 VH  

 

53

179

9/29/2012

765

764

-5

5

-71

66

1.65

11

-86

 -81

16

-15

 VH  

 

54

180 Spring begins

9/30/2012

764

766

-9

5

-72

63

1.575

10

-82

 -77

19

-10

 VH  

SPRING AT MSL AND SOUTH POLE

55

180

10/1/2012

768

766

-2

-1

-74

72

1.8

10

-82

 -78

12

-8

 VH  

 

56

181

10/2/2012

770

768

-4

-3.8

-73

69

1.725

10

-85

 -80

14

-12

 VH  

 

57

181

10/3/2012

779

769

-3

-3.8

-73

70

1.75

12

-87

 -82

15

-14

 VH  

 

58

182

10/4/2012

779

769

-3

-3

-74

71

1.775

11

-87

 -82

14

-13 

 VH  

 

59

183

10/5/2012

781

771

-1

-1

-76

75

1.875

11

-87

 -82

12

-11

 VH  

 

60

183

10/6/2012

785

772

-2

-2

-75

73

1.825

12

-89

-84

14

-14

 VH  

 

61

184

10/7/2012

779

772

-2

-1

-72

70

1.75

12

-88

 -83

14

-16

 VH  

 

62

184

10/8/2012

782

774

-1

-1

-72

71

1.775

11

-87

 -82

12

-15

 VH  

 

63

185

10/9/2012

786

775

0

-1

-73

73

1.825

11

-86

 -81

11

-13

 VH  

 

64

186

10/10/2012

785

776

0

-1

-74

74

1.85

12

-87

 -83

12

-13

 VH  

 

65

186

10/11/2012

785

777

-2

-2

-72

70

1.75

12

-87

 -82

14

-15

 VH  

 

66

187

10/12/2012

781

778

-2

-5

-73

71

1.775

11

-88

 -83

13

-15

 VH  

 

67

187

10/13/2012

N/A

780

-6

-1

-73

67

1.675

13

-86

 -81

19

-13

 VH  

 

68

188

10/14/2012

N/A

781

-2

 

-71

69

1.725

12

-85

 -80

14

-14

 VH  

 

69

189

10/15/2012

N/A

778

0

 

-73

73

1.825

12

-87

 -82

12

-14

H  

 

70

189

10/17/2012

785

783

-1

-2

-72

71

1.775

13

-87

 -82

14

-15

 VH  

 

71

190

10/18/2012

786

784

-2

 

-71

69

1.725

12

-86

 -81

14

-15 

 VH  

 

72

190

10/19/2012

788

785

-2

0

-73

71

1.775

12

-87

 -82

14

-14

 VH  

 

73

191

10/20/2012

790

788

0

-2

-70

70

1.75

13

-88

 -83

13

-18

 VH  

 

74

192

10/21/2012

N/A

790

-5

 

-72

67

1.675

13

-88

 -83

18

-16

 VH  

 

75

192

10/22/2012

791

791

-1

-1

-73

72

1.8

12

-89

 -84

13

-16

 VH  

 

76

193

10/23/2012

791

792

-1

-1

-73

72

1.8

14

-88

 -83

15

-15

 VH  

 

77

193

10/24/2012

793

792

0

-1

-71

71

1.775

14

-88

 -83

14

-17

 VH  

 

78

194

10/25/2012

794

793

0

0

-71

71

1.775

13

-87

 -82

13

-16

 VH  

 

79

195

10/26/2012

795.5

795

-1

-2

-73

72

1.8

13

-89

 -84

14

-16

 VH  

 

80

195

10/27/2012

797

796

-3

-1

-70

67

1.675

14

-86

 -82

17

-16

 VH  

 

81

196

10/28/2012

799

798

-2

-1.5

-72

70

1.75

13

-87

 -82

15

-15

 VH  

 

82

196

10/29/2012

798

799

0

-0.4

-72

72

1.8

13

-88

 -83

13

-16

 VH  

 

83

197

10/30/2012

800.51

801

0

-0.5

-72

72

1.8

15

-88

 -83

15

-16

 VH  

 

84

198

10/31/2012

800

801

0

-0.5

-70

70

1.75

15

-86

 -82

15

-16

 VH  

 

85

198

11/1/2012

805

805

-1

-0.9

-71

70

1.75

14

-86

 -81

15

-15

 VH  

 

86

199

11/2/2012

808

808

-4

-4

-71

67

1.675

15

-86

 -81

19

-15

 VH  

 

87

199

11/3/2012

808.7

808

-2

-4

-70

68

1.7

15

-86

 -81

17

-16

 VH  

 

88

200

11/4/2012

N/A

811

-2

 

-70

68

1.7

15

-87

 -82

17

-17

 VH  

 

89

201

11/5/2012

813.25

813

-1

-1

-73

72

1.8

15

-87

 -82

16

-14

 VH  

 

90

201

11/6/2012

814

813

0

-0.4

-71

71

1.775

16

-84

 -80

16

-13

 VH  

 

91

202

11/7/2012

818

817

-1

-0.8

-74

73

1.825

15

-86

 -81

16

-12

 VH  

 

92

202

11/8/2012

820.29

820

-1

0

-74

73

1.825

15

-87

 -82

16

-13

 VH  

 

93

203

11/9/2012

N/A

819

-1

 

-72

71

1.775

15

-86

 -81

16

-14

 VH  

 

94

204

11/10/2012

822.43

822

0

 

-70

70

1.75

15

-86

 -81

15

-16

 VH  

 

95

204

11/11/2012

815.53

822

0

 

-68

68

1.7

14

-84

 -79

14

-16

 VH  

 

96

205

11/12/2012

827

826

2

2

-71

73

1.825

15

-84

 -79

13

-13

 VH  

 

97

206

11/13/2012

828

828

-3

 

-68

65

1.625

14

-83

 --79

17

-15

 VH  

 

98

206

11/14/2012

829

828

-1

 

-68

67

1.675

15

-83

 -79

16

-15

 VH  

 

99

207

11/15/2012

829.59

829

-1

-1

-68

67

1.675

13

-80

 -76

14

-12

 VH  

 

100

207

11/16/2012

N/A

829

-1

 

-66

65

1.625

13

-81

 -77

14

-15

 VH  

 

101

208

11/17/2012

N/A

830

-2

 

-65

63

1.575

15

-81

-77

17

-16

 VH  

 

102

209

11/18/2012

833.41

833

-3

8

-67

64

1.6

17

-80

 -75

20

-13

 VH  

 

103

209

11/19/2012

N/A

836

-3

 

-66

63

1.575

18

-85

 -80

21

-19

 VH  

 

104

210

11/20/2012

839

838

-5

4.7

-67

62

1.55

17

-83

 -78

22

-16

 VH  

 

105

211

11/21/2012

N/A

839

-6

 

-66

60

1.5

17

-81

 -77

23

-15

H 

 

106

211

11/23/2012

N/A

841

-8

 

-66

58

1.45

17

-82

 -78

25

-16

H 

 

107

212

11/24/2012

N/A

844

-5

 

-66

61

1.525

16

-84

-80

21

-18

H 

 

108

212

11/25/2012

847

845

-4

5

-65

61

1.525

16

-82

 -78

20

-17

H 

 

109

213

11/26/2012

N/A

844

-3

 

-64

61

1.525

16

-82

 -78

19

-18

H 

 

110

214

11/27/2012

N/A

848

-5

 

-65

60

1.5

17

-82

 -78

22

-17

H 

 

111

214

11/28/2012

N/A

849

-4

 

-66

62

1.55

17

-81

 -77

21

-15

 VH

 

112

215

11/29/2012

852

852

-8

5

-65

57

1.425

18

-83

 -79

26

-18

 VH 

 

113

216

11/30/2012

850

857

-6

3

-66

60

1.5

15

-81

 -77

21

-15

 VH 

 

114

216

12/1/2012

857

857

-6

3

-69

63

1.575

18

-82

-78

24

-13

 VH 

 

115

217

12/2/2012

857.26

857

-8

1

-66

58

1.45

16

-82

 -78

24

-16

 VH 

 

116

217

12/3/2012

857

859

-6

5

-67

61

1.525

17

-82

 -78

23

-15

 VH 

 

117

218

12/4/2012

862

861

-5

3.45

-66

61

1.525

18

-80

 -76

23

-14

 VH 

 

118

219

12/5/2012

864

864

-6

4.53

-65

59

1.475

18

-81

 -77

24

-16

 VH 

 

119

219

12/6/2012

866.3

866

-6

3.12

-66

60

1.5

18

-82

 -78

24

-16

 VH 

 

120

220

12/7/2012

867.5

867

-3

5.91

-67

64

1.6

16

-83

-79

19

-16

 VH 

 

121

221

12/8/2012

865.4

869

0

1.31

-66

66

1.65

9

-71

 -68

9

-5

H 

 

122

221

12/9/2012

N/A

869

-3

 

-65

62

1.55

3

-70

 -66

6

-5

 VH 

 

123

222

12/10/2012

875.96

875

-10

2.1

-66

56

1.4

2

-65

 -62

12

1

H 

 

124

223

12/11/2012

876.84

876

-5

5.4

-66

61

1.525

5

-67

 -63

10

-1

 VH 

 

125

223

12/12/2012

875.25

880

-5

3.4

-68

63

1.575

6

-69

 -66

11

-1

 VH 

 

126

224

12/13/2012

880

880

-4

-5

-66

62

1.55

6

-75

-71

10

-9

 VH 

 

127

224

12/14/2012

884

884

-1

 

-67

66

1.65

7

-75

 -71

8

-8

 VH 

 

128

225

12/15/2012

884

883

-3

-4

-67

64

1.6

6

-73

 -69

9

-6

H 

 

129

226

12/16/2012

894

886

-2

-4

-65

63

1.575

5

-73

 -69

7

-8

H 

 

130

226

12/17/2012

889

888

-9

-6

-65

56

1.4

5

-73

 -70

14

-8

H 

 

131

227

12/18/2012

888

889

-8

-7

-65

57

1.425

5

-73

 -70

13

-8

 VH 

 

132

228

12/19/2012

892.84

890

-6

-6.8

-65

59

1.475

4

-73

-69

10

-8

 VH 

 

133

228

12/20/2012

891.21

891

1

0.6

-65

66

1.65

5

-72

 -69

4

-7

 VH 

 

134

229

12/21/2012

893.99

893

-1

-0.62

-67

66

1.65

7

-78

 -74

8

-11

 VH 

 

135

230

12/22/2012

894.34

894

-5

-4.66

-65

60

1.5

8

-76

 -72

13

-11

 VH 

 

136

230

12/23/2012

N/A

897

-1

 

-65

64

1.6

7

-78

 -74

8

-13

 VH 

 

137

231

12/24/2012

N/A

896

-1

 

-64

63

1.575

7

-75

 -71

8

-11

 VH 

 

138

232

12/25/2012

N/A

899

-1

 

-65

64

1.6

7

-75

 -71

8

-10

 VH 

 

139

232

12/26/2012

N/A

899

0

 

-66

66

1.65

8

-75

-71

8

-9

 VH 

 

140

233

12/27/2012

N/A

903

-2

 

-66

64

1.6

7

-76

 -71

9

-10

 VH 

 

141

233

12/28/2012

N/A

904

-2

 

-64

62

1.55

7

-76

 -72

9

-12

 VH 

 

142

234

12/29/2012

N/A

906

0

 

-65

65

1.625

8

-77

 -73

8

-12

 VH 

 

143

235

12/31/2012

N/A

908

-2

-3

-63

61

1.525

8

-76

 -72

10

-13

 VH 

 

144

235

1/1/2013

N/A: Note there was also an 851 Pa pressure listed for Sol 144, but the Earth date was 12/31/2012.

907

2

 

-64

66

1.65

7

-75

 -71

5

-11

 VH 

 

145

236

1/2/2013

908

909

-1

-2

-64

63

1.575

6

-74

 -70

7

-10

 VH 

 

146

237

1/3/2013

N/A

908

-1

 

-65

64

1.6

7

-76

 -72

8

-11

 VH 

 

147

237

1/4/2013

N/A

914

0

 

-65

65

1.625

5

-76

 -72

5

-11

 VH 

 

148

238

1/5/2013

N/A

912

3

 

-65

68

1.7

5

-74

 -70

2

-9

 VH 

 

149

239

1/6/2013

914

914

0

3

-65

65

1.625

4

-75

 -71

4

-10

 VH 

 

150

239

1/7/2013

913

913

-3

2

-64

61

1.525

5

-77

-73

8

-13

 VH 

 

151

240

1/8/2013

915

915

-3

 

-65

62

1.55

4

-73

-69

7

-8

 VH 

 

152

241

1/9/2013

914.5

914

1

3.85

-63

64

1.6

5

-73

 -69

4

-10

 VH 

 

153

241

1/10/2013

916

915

1

3

-65

66

1.65

4

-74

 -70

3

-9

 VH 

 

154

242

1/11/2013

917.7

917

-2

1.45

-65

63

1.575

4

-76

 -72

6

-11

 VH 

 

155

243

1/12/2013

917.5

917

0

2.15

-64

64

1.6

4

-74

 -70

4

-10

 VH 

 

156

243

1/13/2013

917.7

922

0

2

-65

65

1.625

4

-77

 -73

4

-12

 VH 

 

157

244

1/14/2013

920.7

920

-2

1.75

-64

62

1.55

5

-75

 -71

7

-11

 VH 

 

158

245

1/15/2013

922.99

922

-3

3

-66

63

1.575

3

-74

 -70

6

-8

 VH 

 

159

245

1/16/2013

918.47

918

-4

3.51

-65

61

1.525

4

-75

 -72

8

-10

 VH 

 

160

246

1/17/2013

919.82

919

-3

 

-67

64

1.6

5

-75

 -72

8

-8

 VH 

 

161

246

1/18/2013

920.3

919

-2

0

-65

63

1.575

5

-75

 -71

7

-10

 VH 

 

162

247

1/19/2013

920

919

-1

1

-65

64

1.6

7

-77

 -72

8

-12

 VH 

 

163

248

1/20/2013

920

919

-1

0

-65

64

1.6

5

-75

 -71

6

-10

 VH 

 

164

248

1/21/2013

919.46

919

-1

0

-64

63

1.575

7

-71

-68

8

-7

H 

 

165

249

1/22/2013

923.09

922

-3

0

-65

62

1.55

4

-72

 -69

7

-7

H 

 

166

250

1/23/2013

922

922

-5

3

-65

60

1.5

3

-71

 -67

8

-6

H 

 

167

250

1/24/2013

921

920

-3

4

-65

62

1.55

5

-73

 -69

8

-8

H 

 

168

251

1/25/2013

924

923

1

5

-66

67

1.675

6

-73

 -69

5

-7

H 

 

169

252

1/26/2013

923

922

0

4

-66

66

1.65

5

-74

 -70

5

-8

H 

 

170

252

1/27/2013

N/A

925

0

 

-66

66

1.65

5

-73

-69

5

-7

H 

 

171

253

1/28/2013

N/A

925

1

6

-67

68

1.7

5

-75

 -71

4

-8

H 

925 Pa is highest pressure not retracted. Also seen on Sol 846 in Year 2.

172

254

1/29/2013

925

923

0

6

-67

67

1.675

6

-74

 -71

6

-7

H 

 

173

254

1/30/2013

924

920

0

5

-67

67

1.675

5

-75

 -71

5

-8

H 

 

174

255

1/31/2013

924.7

921

0

5

-67

67

1.675

7

-75

 -71

7

-8

H 

 

175

256

2/1/2013

N/A

921

-4

 

-68

64

1.6

5

-74

 -70

9

-6

H 

 

176

256

2/2/2013

919

920

0

5

-67

67

1.675

5

-73

 -69

5

-6

H 

 

177

257

2/3/2013

922.35

921

-1

5.2

-66

65

1.625

5

-73

 -69

6

-7

H 

 

178

258

2/4/2013

921.31

920

-2

 

-66

64

1.6

5

-74

 -71

7

-8

H 

 

179

258

2/6/2013

920

920

-7

5

-66

59

1.475

4

-77

-72

11

-11

H 

 

180

259

2/7/2013

NR

919

-1

4

-67

66

1.65

5

-74

 -70

6

-7

H 

 

181

260

2/8/2013

921.96

918

1

N/A

-67

68

1.7

5

-74

 -70

4

-7

H 

 

182

260

2/9/2013

N/A

921

0

6

-67

67

1.675

7

-75

 -70

7

-8

H 

 

183

261

2/10/2013

920

921

-1

 

-67

66

1.65

5

-76

 -72

6

-9

H 

 

184

261

2/11/2013

923

923

0

3

-67

67

1.675

5

-75

 -71

5

-8

H 

 

185

263

2/12/2013

N/A

923

-5

4

-67

62

1.55

7

-76

 -72

12

-9

H 

 

186

263

2/13/2013

N/A

922

-2

4

-66

64

1.6

4

-75

 -71

6

-9

H 

 

187

264

2/14/2013

920.5

921

-1

6

-67

66

1.65

6

-77

 -73

7

-10

H 

 

188

264

2/15/2013

920

920

-3

2

-68

65

1.625

6

-75

 -72

9

-7

 VH

 

189

265

2/16/2013

921.09

920

-2

 

-68

66

1.65

5

-75

 -71

7

-7

H 

 

190

265

2/17/2013

918

917

-3

 

-66

63

1.575

6

-76

 -72

9

-10

H 

 

191

266

2/18/2013

921

921

-3

 

-67

64

1.6

6

-75

 -71

9

-8

  VH

 

192

267

2/19/2013

940

N/A

-16

 

-68

52

1.3

7

-1 changed to N/A

 N/A

23

67

N/A 

WAS 940 Pa ON INTERIM

193

267

2/20/2013

N/A

N/A

NO REPORT

 

 

NO REPORT

NO REPORT

 

 

 N/A 

#VALUE!

0

N/A 

 

194

268

2/21/2013

N/A

N/A

NO REPORT

 

 

NO REPORT

NO REPORT

 

 

 N/A

NO REPORT

0

N/A 

 

195

269

2/22/2013

886

N/A

1

 

-53

54

1.35

4

-61

 N/A 

3

-8

N/A 

WAS 886 ON INTERIM

196

269

2/23/2013

N/A

916

-3

 

-66

63

1.575

6

-74

-70

9

-8

H 

 

197

270 Summer begins

2/24/2013

915.8

915

-3

 

-68

65

1.625

5

-75

 -72

8

-7

H 

SUMMER AT SOUTH POLE

198

271

2/25/2013

914.34

914

-2

5

-67

65

1.625

5

-74

 -70

7

-7

H 

 

199

271

2/26/2013

917

917

0

6

-66

66

1.65

3

-75

 -71

3

-9

H 

 

200

272

2/27/2013

937

N/A

-21

 

-68

47

1.175

2

-75

 N/A

23

-7

N/A 

WAS 937 Pa ON INTERIM

201

 

2/28/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

202

 

3/1/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

203

 

3/2/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

204

 

3/3/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

205

 

3/4/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

206

 

3/5/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

207

 

3/6/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

208

 

3/7/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

209

 

3/8/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

210

 

3/9/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

211

 

3/10/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

212

 

3/11/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

213

 

3/12/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

214

 

3/13/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

215

281

3/15/2013

874

N/A

-4

 

-28

24

0.6

7

-4

 N/A

11

24

N/A 

WAS 874 Pa ON INTERIM

216

 

3/16/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

217

 

3/17/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

218

 

3/18/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

219

 

3/19/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

220

 

3/20/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

221

 

3/21/2013

918

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

222

286

3/22/2013

868

N/A

-3

 

-54

51

1.275

6

-59

 N/A

9

-5

N/A 

WAS 868 Pa ON INTERIM

223

287

3/23/2013

895

895

-5

 

-71

66

1.65

6

-76

 -72

11

-5

 VH 

 

224

287

3/24/2013

N/A

894

-1

3

-69

68

1.7

6

-76

 -71

7

-7

 VH 

 

225

288

3/25/2013

894.65

894

-8

1

-71

63

1.575

6

-76

 -72

14

-5

 VH 

 

226

288

3/26/2013

892.9

894

1

4

-70

71

1.775

5

-75

 -71

4

-5

 VH 

 

227

289

3/27/2013

894.27

892

4

5

-70

74

1.85

6

-76

 -72

2

-6

 VH 

 

228

290

3/28/2013

894.6

894

3

2

-71

74

1.85

7

-75

 -71

4

-4

 VH 

 

229

290

3/29/2013

N/A

894

-4

1

-69

65

1.625

6

-74

 -70

10

-5

 VH 

 

230

291

3/30/2013

890.7

888

0

 

-69

69

1.725

6

-76

 -72

6

-7

 VH 

 

231

292

3/31/2013

888.32

890

-6

2

-71

65

1.625

6

-77

 -73

12

-6

 VH 

 

232

292

4/1/2013

890.2

888

-5

2

-69

64

1.6

6

-76

 -72

11

-7

 VH 

 

233

293

4/2/2013

889.18

889

-3

5

-69

66

1.65

6

-77

 -73

9

-8

 VH 

 

234

293

4/3/2013

890

890

-4

 

-69

65

1.625

5

-77

 -73

9

-8

 VH 

 

235

294

4/4/2013

N/A

886

0

 

-70

70

1.75

6

-77

 -73

6

-7

 VH 

 

236

295

4/5/2013

N/A

886

-3

 

-72

69

1.725

6

-76

 -72

9

-4

 VH 

 

237

295

4/6/2013

N/A

883

-5

 

-71

66

1.65

5

-77

 -73

10

-6

 VH 

 

238

296

4/7/2013

N/A

885

-2

 

-70

68

1.7

6

-76

 -72

8

-6

 VH 

 

239

297

4/8/2013

N/A

885

-1

 

-73

72

1.8

5

-77

 -73

6

-4

 VH 

 

240

297

4/9/2013

N/A

884

-6

 

-70

64

1.6

5

-76

 -72

11

-6

 VH 

 

241

298

4/10/2013

N/A

884

0

 

-72

72

1.8

4

-77

 -73

4

-5

 VH 

 

242

298

4/11/2013

N/A

881

-7

 

-70

63

1.575

6

-77

 -72

13

-7

 VH 

 

243

299

4/12/2013

N/A

884

-7

 

-71

64

1.6

5

-77

 -73

12

-6

 VH 

 

244

300

4/13/2013

N/A

878

-6

 

-69

63

1.575

6

-76

 -72

12

-7

 VH 

 

245

300

4/14/2013

N/A

879

-6

 

-70

64

1.6

5

-76

 -72

11

-6

 VH 

 

246

301

4/15/2013

N/A

878

-1

 

-73

72

1.8

6

-77

 -73

7

-4

 VH 

 

247

301

4/16/2013

N/A

873

-4

 

-71

67

1.675

5

-77

 -73

9

-6

 VH 

 

248

302

4/17/2013

N/A

877

-4

 

-70

66

1.65

3

-75

 -71

7

-5

H 

 

249

303

4/18/2013

N/A

873

-3

 

-69

66

1.65

4

-77

 -72

7

-8

H 

 

250

303

4/19/2013

N/A

877

-2

 

-70

68

1.7

4

-76

 -72

6

-6

 VH 

 

251

304

4/20/2013

N/A

876

-2

 

-71

69

1.725

6

-77

 -73

8

-6

 VH 

 

252

304

4/22/2013

N/A

874

-8

 

-71

63

1.575

5

-77

 -72

13

-6

 VH 

 

253

305

4/23/2013

N/A

877

-6

 

-71

65

1.625

4

-77

 -73

10

-6

 VH 

 

254

306

4/24/2013

N/A

871

-3

 

-70

67

1.675

4

-77

 -73

7

-7

 VH 

 

255

306

4/25/2013

N/A

877

-5

 

-69

64

1.6

5

-77

 -72

10

-8

 VH 

 

256

307

4/26/2013

N/A

871

-2

 

-70

68

1.7

4

-77

 -73

6

-7

 VH 

 

257

308

4/27/2013

N/A

871

-1

 

-70

69

1.725

4

-77

 -73

5

-7

 VH 

 

258

308

4/28/2013

N/A

869

-9

 

-71

62

1.55

5

-77

 -73

14

-6

 VH 

 

259

309

4/29/2013

N/A

871

-3

 

-72

69

1.725

5

-77

 -73

8

-5

H 

 

260

309

4/30/2013

N/A

875

-11

 

-70

59

1.475

2

-76

 -72

13

-6

H 

 

261

310

5/1/2013

868.05

868

-4

 

-70

66

1.65

4

-77

 -73

8

-7

H 

 

262

311

5/2/2013

900

N/A

-22

 

-71

49

1.225

-2

-76

 N/A

20

-5

N/A 

WAS 900 Pa ON INTERIM

263

 

5/3/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

264

 

5/4/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

265

 

5/5/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

266

 

5/6/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

267

313

5/7/2013

864

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A 

 

268

314

5/8/2013

864.3

864

-5

 

-70

65

1.625

2

-75

 -71

7

-5

H  

 

269

315

5/9/2013

866.21

866

-3

 

-70

67

1.675

2

-74

 -71

5

-4

H  

 

270

315

5/10/2013

N/A

863

-6

 

-67

61

1.525

1

-75

 -71

7

-8

H  

 

271

316

5/11/2013

N/A

864

-6

 

-69

63

1.575

2

-74

 -70

8

-5

H  

 

272

316

5/12/2013

N/A

864

-5

 

-71

66

1.65

-2

-76

 -72

3

-5

H  

 

273

317

5/13/2013

N/A

861

-4

 

-70

66

1.65

-2

-71

 -67

2

-1

H 

 

274

318

5/14/2013

865

861

-1

 

-68

67

1.675

-2

-72

 -68

-1

-4

H  

 

275

318

5/15/2013

N/A

860

-6

 

-67

61

1.525

-2

-72

 -68

4

-5

H 

 

276

319

5/16/2013

864

858

-4

 

-69

65

1.625

-1

-74

 -71

3

-5

H  

 

277

319

5/17/2013

N/A

857

-4

 

-69

65

1.625

-2

-73

 -69

2

-4

H  

 

278

320

5/18/2013

856.28

855

-3

 

-67

64

1.6

-2

-71

 -67

1

-4

H  

 

279

321

5/19/2013

856

856

-5

 

-68

63

1.575

-2

-71

 -68

3

-3

H  

 

280

321

5/20/2013

855

856

-4

 

-69

65

1.625

0

-74

 -70

4

-5

H  

 

281

322

5/21/2013

855.5

855

-2

 

-68

66

1.65

-1

-73

 -70

1

-5

H  

 

282

322

5/22/2013

N/A

856

-2

 

-72

70

1.75

-1

-74

 -70

1

-2

H  

 

283

323

5/23/2013

855.88

854

-4

 

-68

64

1.6

0

-74

 -70

4

-6

H  

 

284

323

5/24/2013

N/A

854

-3

 

-71

68

1.7

-2

-74

 -70

1

-3

H  

 

285

324

5/25/2013

852

852

-5

 

-70

65

1.625

0

-75

 -71

5

-5

H  

 

286

325

5/26/2013

N/A

854

-2

 

-71

69

1.725

-1

-74

 -70

1

-3 H  

 

287

325

5/27/2013

853.68

856

-3

 

-72

69

1.725

-2

-73

 -69

1

-1

H  

 

288

326

5/29/2013

854.2

854

-4

 

-69

65

1.625

-1

-74

 -70

3

-5

H  

 

289

326

5/30/2013

N/A

854

-3

 

-71

68

1.7

-1

-74

 -70

2

-3

H  

 

290

327

5/31/2013

850

853

-3

 

-71

68

1.7

-1

-75

 -71

2

-4

H  

 

291

327

6/1/2013

N/A

853

-4

 

-70

66

1.65

-1

-74

 -70

3

-4

H  

 

292

328

6/2/2013

N/A

853

-1

 

-71

70

1.75

-2

-75

 -71

-1

-4

H  

 

293

329

6/3/2013

850

850

-4

 

-72

68

1.7

0

-76

 -72

4

-4

H  

 

294

329

6/4/2013

852

852

-4

 

-72

68

1.7

-1

-76

 -71

3

-4

H  

 

295

330

6/5/2013

852

853

-15

 

-71

56

1.4

-2

-75

 -71

13

-4

H  

 

296

330

6/6/2013

850

850

-9

 

-71

62

1.55

0

-77

 -73

9

-6

H  

 

297

331

6/7/2013

N/A

849

-7

 

-72

65

1.625

1

-77

 -73

8

-5

H  

 

298

331

6/8/2013

N/A

850

-3

 

-72

69

1.725

2

-80

 -76

5

-8

H  

 

299

332

6/9/2013

851

849

-9

 

-71

62

1.55

-2

-80

 -76

7

-9

H  

 

300

333

6/10/2013

852

852

-8

 

-72

64

1.6

-3

-78

 -73

5

-6

H  

 

301

333

6/11/2013

N/A

852

-6

 

-73

67

1.675

-5

-76

 -72

1

-3

H  

 

302

334

6/12/2013

N/A

850

-3

 

-71

68

1.7

0

-73

 -69

3

-2

H  

 

303

334

6/13/2013

N/A

849

-8

 

-71

63

1.575

1

-78

 -74

9

-7

H  

 

304

335

6/14/2013

N/A

848

-6

 

-70

64

1.6

1

-77

 -72

7

-7

H  

 

305

335

6/15/2013

N/A

847

-5

 

-71

66

1.65

1

-78

 -74

6

-7

H  

 

306

336

6/16/2013

N/A

848

-8

 

-71

63

1.575

1

-79

 -75

9

-8

H  

 

307

336

6/17/2013

N/A

851

-8

 

-72

64

1.6

-4

-79

 -75

4

-7

H  

 

308

337

6/18/2013

N/A

850

-5

 

-73

68

1.7

-2

-73

 -69

3

0

H  

 

309

338

6/19/2013

N/A

848

-7

 

-72

65

1.625

-3

-75

 -71

4

-3

H  

 

310

338

6/20/2013

N/A

849

-9

 -71

-118

109 revised to 62

2.725 revised to 1.55

-2

-73

 -69

7

45 revised to -2

H 

Air low changed from -118  to -71

311

339

6/21/2013

N/A

846

-8

 

-74

66

1.65

-3

-74

 -70

5

0

H  

 

312

340

6/22/2013

N/A

845

-11

 

-71

60

1.5

-2

-74

 -70

9

-3

H  

 

313

340

6/23/2013

N/A

849

-14

 

-77

63

1.575

1

-74

 -70

15

3

H  

 

314

340

6/24/2013

N/A

848

-11

 

-73

62

1.55

2

-77

 -73

13

-4

H  

 

315

341

6/25/2013

N/A

850

-10

 

-74

64

1.6

2

-77

 -72

12

-3

H  

 

316

341

6/26/2013

N/A

851

-16

 

-74

58

1.45

2

-77

 -72

18

-3

H  

 

317

342

6/27/2013

N/A

849

-4

 

-72

68

1.7

1

-77

 -73

5

-5

H  

 

318

342

6/28/2013

N/A

849

-4

 

-72

68

1.7

2

-82

 -77

6

-10

H  

 

319

343

6/29/2013

N/A

847

-3

 

-73

70

1.75

4

-80

 -76

7

-7

H  

 

320

344

6/30/2013

N/A

846

-4

 

-71

67

1.675

3

-77

 -76

7

-6

H  

 

321

344

7/1/2013

N/A

847

-5

 

-75

70

1.75

2

-80

 -76

7

-5

H  

 

322

345

7/2/2013

N/A

849

-5

 

-74

69

1.725

3

-80

 -76

8

-6

H 

 

323

345

7/3/2013

N/A

847

-6

 

-74

68

1.7

3

-82

 -78

9

-8

H  

 

324

346

7/4/2013

N/A

850

-8

 

-75

67

1.675

7

-84

 -79

15

-9

H  

 

325

346

7/6/2013

N/A

847

-8

N/A

-74

66