Mars Opacity: REMS Team Disinformation vs. Malin Space Science Systems Truth

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This page under construction on 10/10/2017.

       This article will compare opacity reports from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Team in Spain with weekly weather videos and reports issued by the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). It will show that, as we suspected, the claim up through Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover Sol 1,825 that all 1,825 sols reported were “sunny” is a false claim. Rather, it appears, NASA/JPL and in particular Malin have permitted the truth to be published, but not on the primary weather reporting site run by the REMS Team. The false data at the REMS Team report is only part of what is a habit of sloppy, unprofessional and knowingly wrong information that has persisted since the landing of Curiosity. We think the entire REMS Team should be fired and immediately be replaced by Malin, with a degree of oversight exercised by the Roffman Mars Correct Team and our partners in Europe – Marco de Marco and Matteo Fagone.

 

       The images were derived from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Color Imager. The weekly image videos for the period of time from MSL's landing on August 6, 2017 up through 2017 can be found at links on Table 1 below. Data with a yellowish background can be used to refute REMS Team claims that every sol at MSL is sunny. All of these images were from MARCI (Mars Color Imager) which produces a global weather map of Mars to help characterize daily, seasonal, and year-to-year variations in the red planet's climate. MARCI also observes processes such as dust storms and changes in the polar cap using five visible bands.  In addition, MARCI makes ultraviolet observations at two wavelengths to detect variations in ozone, dust, and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. MARCI observes these processes on scales of tens of kilometers.

       The Principal Investigator (lead scientist) is Mike Malin from Malin Space Science Systems. http://www.msss.com/mro/marci/index.html. The top video link was put together by Marco de Marco.

 

 

 TABLE 1 - CLOUD AND DUST CONDITIONS ON MARS FROM AUGUST 30, 2012 TO 2017  

Terrestrial Week - Column 2 only emphasizes conditions at Curiosity and Opportunity. To see the wider weather on Mars click on the link dates below.

Extracts of the MSSS reports that mention weather at the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater, Mars, weather at MRE Opportunity and weather in equatorial regions where both rovers are found. 
Issues (only provided for rows with a yellowish shading).

30 August 2012 – 2 September 2012 released: 5 September 2012

Water ice clouds continued to dominate the afternoon skies at equatorial latitudes, including at the Curiosity and Opportunity rover sites.

Do these clouds only form in the afternoon? Are there enough clouds to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny.?"

3 September 2012 – 9 September 2012 released: 12 September 2012

Water ice clouds were observed over the major shield volcanoes and tenuously over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 Are there enough clouds to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny.?"

10 September 2012 – 16 September 2012 released: 19 September 2012

Afternoon water ice clouds were observed over all the major shield volcanoes, as well as, at equatorial latitudes, including both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Do these clouds only form in the afternoon? Are there enough clouds to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny.?"

17 September 2012 – 23 September 2012 released: 26 September 2012

Aside from a few tenuous water ice clouds, skies over the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater remained relatively clear.

Clear or partly cloudy?

24 September 2012 – 30 September 2012 released: 3 October 2012

Scattered water ice cloud cover was observed around the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 Clear or partly cloudy?

8 October 2012 – 14 October 2012 released: 17 October 2012

Aside from scattered, diffuse water ice cloud cover, skies around the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater remained relatively clear.

 Clear or partly cloudy?

22 October 2012 – 28 October 2012 released: 31 October 2012

Afternoon water ice clouds were observed over Tempe, Olympus Mons, and the Tharsis shield volcanoes, as well as, at equatorial latitudes, including near both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Do these clouds only form in the afternoon? Are there enough clouds to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny.?"  

29 October 2012 – 4 November 2012 released: 7 November 2012

Water ice clouds persisted over the Tharsis volcanoes and over much of the northern plains, as well as, at equatorial latitudes, including near both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

If the clouds persisted, were they present in the morning, or did they only reform in the afternoon?

5 November 2012 – 11 November 2012 released: 14 November 2012

Water ice clouds persisted over the Tharsis volcanoes and over much of the northern plains, as well as, at equatorial latitudes, including near both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Are there enough clouds to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny.?"   

12 November 2012 – 18 November 2012 released: 21 November 2012   

But both rover sites experienced elevated atmospheric dust levels as a result of the storm, similar to atmospheric opacity levels experienced on typical hazy summer day in Los Angeles. With higher atmospheric dust concentrations came a warming of the thin Martian atmosphere, resulting in a diminishing of water ice cloud cover across the tropics.

Was the sun obscured?

17 December 2012 – 23 December 2012 released: 26 December 2012

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

24 December 2012 – 30 December 2012 released: 2 January 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

31 December 2012 – 06 January 2013 released: 9 January 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

7 January 2013 – 13 January 2013 released: 16 January 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

14 January 2013 – 20 January 2013 released: 23 January 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

21 January 2013 – 27 January 2013 released: 30 January 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

28 January 2013 – 3 February 2013 released: 6 February 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

4 February 2013 – 10 February 2013 released: 13 February 201

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

11 February 2013 – 17 February 2013 released: 20 February 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

18 February 2013 – 24 February 2013 released: 27 February 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 

25 February 2013 – 3 March 2013 released: 6 March 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 

4 March 2013 – 10 March 2013 released: 13 March 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 

11 March 2013 – 17 March 2013 released: 20 March 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 

18 March 2013 – 24 March 2013 released: 27 March 2013

Afternoon skies were storm-free all week over both the Opportunity site in Meridian and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater

 

25 March 2013 – 31 March 2013 released: 03 April 2013 h 2013 released: 27 March 2013

Clear skies observed over both the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

1 April 2013 – 7 April 2013 released: 10 April 2013

Afternoon skies remained clear over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

22 April 2013 – 28 April 2013 released: 01 May 2013

Diffuse water ice haze lingered in afternoon skies over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani, but otherwise skies were clear and relatively dust-free both in Meridiani and over the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

6 May 2013 – 12 May 2013 released: 15 May 2013

Hazy conditions persisted across the rest of the southern tropics including the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater as a result of the continuous storm activity.

Is the hazy condition enough to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny?"  

13 May 2013 – 19 May 2013 released: 22 May 2013

In the southern tropics, skies above the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater were still murky, but they were beginning to slowly clear.

Is the murky condition enough to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny?"   

20 May 2013 – 26 May 2013 released: 29 May 2013

Clearing afternoon skies observed over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Is the morning condition enough to negate the REMS opacity rating for these sols as "sunny?"  

27 May 2013 – 2 June 2013 released: 05 June 2013

Afternoon skies remained clear and dust-free over both the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

3 June 2013 – 9 June 2013 released: 12 June 2013

Afternoon skies continued to clear and remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

10 June 2013 – 16 June 2013 released: 19 June 2013

Skies were storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale crater.

 

24 June 2013 – 30 June 2013 released: 03 July 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

1 July 2013 – 7 July 2013 released: 10 July 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

8 July 2013 – 14 July 2013 released: 17 July 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

15 July 2013 – 21 July 2013 released: 24 July 2013

Afternoon skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

22 July 2013 – 28 July 2013 released: 31 July 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

5 August 2013 – 11 August 2013 released: 14 August 2013

Skies were clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and for the one-year anniversary of Curiosity's landing at Gale Crater.

 

12 August 2013 – 18 August 2013 released: 21 August 2013

Skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

12 August 2013 – 18 August 2013 released: 21 August 2013

Diffuse water ice clouds, that are associated with the developing aphelion equatorial cloud-belt, were present near the equator and in the sub-tropics, as well as over most of the major volcanoes. Skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

26 August 2013 – 1 September 2013 released: 4 September 2013

Skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

16 September 2013 – 22 September 2013 released: 25 September 2013

Storm-free skies over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

30 September 2013 – 6 October 2013 released: 9 October 2013

Skies were relatively clear and storm-free over the rest of the planet, including at the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

7 October 2013 – 13 October 2013 released: 16 October 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

14 October 2013 – 20 October 2013 released: 23 October 2013

Afternoon skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

21 October 2013 – 27 October 2013 released: 30 October 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

28 October 2013 – 3 November 2013 released: 6 November 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

4 November 2013 – 10 November 2013 released: 13 November 2013

Skies remained relatively storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

11 November 2013 – 17 November 2013 released: 20 November 2013

 

Skies remained relatively storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

18 November 2013 – 24 November 2013 released: 27 November 2013

Water ice clouds were observed over all the major shield volcanoes, while those associated with the developing aphelion cloud-belt extended across the tropics of both hemispheres. Skies remained storm-free over the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

25 November 2013 – 1 December 2013 released: 4 December 2013

Developing aphelion cloud-belt were present at equatorial latitudes, notably over central Arabia and Aonia. Skies remained storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

2 December 2013 – 8 December 2013 released: 11 December 2013

Skies remained storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

9 December 2013 – 15 December 2013 released: 18 December 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

16 December 2013 – 22 December 2013 released: 25 December 2013

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

23 December 2013 – 29 December 2013 released: 1 January 2014

No active dust storm were over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale throughout the week.

 

30 December 2013 – 7 January 2014 released: 8 January 2014

The equatorial clouds reached altitudes as high as 30 kilometers. Skies were sunny and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

 13 January 2014 – 19 January 2014 released: 22 January 2014

 6 January 2014 – 12 January 2014 released: 15 January 2014

Skies were relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

13 January 2014 – 19 January 2014 released: 22 January 2014

Skies were relatively storm-free and no active dust-lifting was observed in the vicinity of the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani nor the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

20 January 2014 – 26 January 2014 released: 29 January 2014

Afternoon skies were still storm-free in Meridiani (Opportunity site) and in Gale Crater (Curiosity site).

 

27 January 2014 – 2 February 2014 released: 5 February 2014

Water ice clouds were present in the afternoon across the tropics of both hemispheres and over all the major shield volcanoes. Afternoon skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

Since the landers are in the tropics we assume this means there were water ice clouds present. Does the statement that afternoon skies were storm free mean that there was no dust storms, but the skies were not sunny due to ice clouds? 

10 February 2014 – 16 February 2014 released: 19 February 2014

Afternoon skies were clear and storm free over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

17 February 2014 – 23 February 2014 released: 26 February 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds were present at tropical latitudes, and were particularly visible over Valles Marineris. Skies were relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

24 February 2014 – 2 March 2014 released: 5 March 2014

Afternoon skies were relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

3 March 2014 – 9 March 2014 released: 12 March 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds were present over the equatorial latitudes, particularly in the western hemisphere over Valles Marineris, as well as over the major shield volcanoes. Afternoon skies remained relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site as well as over the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

10 March 2014 – 16 March 2014 released: 19 March 2014

Aside from a few stray clouds in Meridiani, afternoon skies were relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

17 March 2014 – 23 March 2014 released: 26 March 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds dominated the afternoon skies over all the major shield volcanoes, as well as, most tropical latitudes of both hemispheres. Skies were storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

Since the landers are in the tropics we assume this means there were diffuse water ice clouds present. Does the statement that afternoon skies were storm free mean that there was no dust storms, but the skies were not sunny due to ice clouds?   

24 March 2014 – 30 March 2014 released: 2 April 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds, associated with the developing aphelion cloud-belt, were present at equatorial latitudes and over the large shield volcanoes. Afternoon skies continued to remain storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Since the landers are in the tropics we assume this means there were diffuse water ice clouds present. Does the statement that afternoon skies were storm free mean that there was no dust storms, but the skies were not sunny due to ice clouds?    

31 March 2014 – 6 April 2014 released: 9 April 2014

Skies were relatively clear and storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

7 April 2014 – 13 April 2014 released: 16 April 2014

Skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

14 April 2014 – 20 April 2014 released: 23 April 2014

The aphelion water ice cloud belt was present at equatorial latitudes, and diffuse water ice clouds were also present over the major shield volcanoes. Skies were relatively clear and storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Since the landers are in equatorial latitudes we assume this means there were water ice clouds present. Does the statement that afternoon skies were relatively clear and storm free mean that there was no dust storms, but the skies were partly sunny rather than sunny?   

21 April 2014 – 27 April 2014 released: 30 April 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds related to the aphelion cloud belt were present at equatorial latitudes. Skies were relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

28 April 2014 – 4 May 2014 released: 7 May 2014

Skies were clear and storm-free over the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

5 May 2014 – 11 May 2014 released: 14 May 2014

Skies remained clear and storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

12 May 2014 – 18 May 2014 released: 21 May 2014

Mars' equatorial region remained cloudy this past week, with the continued presence of the aphelion water-ice cloud belt. Aside from water-ice clouds over Meridiani, skies were free of storm activity at the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and at the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

Since the landers are in equatorial latitudes we assume this means there were water ice clouds present. Were there only water-ice clouds over Meridiani (Opportunity) and if so was Gale crater fully sunny?

9 June 2014 – 15 June 2014 released: 18 June 2014

Skies remained relatively clear and storm free over both the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

23 June 2014 – 29 June 2014 released: 2 July 2014

This past week, water ice clouds reaching altitudes of up to 30 kilometers, continued to be a prominent afternoon feature at tropical latitudes in both hemispheres. Also of note was the rapid northward expansion of the seasonal polar cap edge into that southern mid-latitude, which was accompanied by a significant increase in weather frontal storm systems. Dust storms, generated by the passage of these fronts, were observed all along the edge of the seasonal cap as well as along the perennial north polar cap in Arcadia, Acidalia, and Utopia. One of the first large dust storms of the Martian "regional dust storm season", covering an area greater than four times that of the state of California, began mid-week in Hellas Basin. During the next two sols (Martian days) the storm moved to the east, at an average speed of 25 m/s (about 56 mph) reaching as far east as western Sirenum. The western trailing edge of the storm was also observed to move to the north into Hesperia, coming within 1440 kilometers of the Curiosity rover site. Though skies had become dustier over the last couple of months, both rover sites remained storm-free, at Endeavor and Gale crater.

Define the cut off between tropical latitudes (about 25 degrees North or South) and equatorial latitudes. If skies had become dustier over the last couple of months, but both rover sites remained storm-free, at Endeavor and Gale crater at what point does dust lower opacity from sunny to not sunny?

30 June 2014 – 6 July 2014 released: 9 July 2014

The regional storm in Promethei, noted in last week's report, had abated. A second storm developed early in week in Hesperia and moved north across the equator into Isidis in the northern hemisphere. This storm was smaller than the previous week's storm. It quickly retreated back into the southern tropics by the next sol (Martian day) where it lingering for an additional two-sols before abating. However, the storm persisted long enough that dust lofted into the atmosphere by the storm was transported eastward over the Curiosity rover site by the westerly (west-to-east) winds that dominate the tropical circulation.  Both rover sites continued to remain storm-free, at Endeavor and Gale crater. The amount of dust transported was relatively small and had a negligible impact on rover operations and science.

If the storm persisted long enough that dust lofted into the atmosphere by the storm was transported eastward over the Curiosity rover site by the westerly (west-to-east) winds that dominate the tropical circulation, does this imply that it was not sunny?

 

Define "negligible" impact on rover operations and science. HOw does it differ from zero?

7 July 2014 – 13 July 2014 released: 16 July 2014

Some residual suspended dust from the regional storm in Cimmeria may have contributed to haze at the Curiosity field site.

 

28 July 2014 – 3 August 2014 released: 6 August 2014

Skies remained relatively storm-free over both the Opportunity rover site at Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

4 August 2014 – 10 August 2014 released: 13 August 2014

Diffuse water ice clouds were present at equatorial latitudes and over the major shield volcanoes, but afternoon cloud coverage continued to decrease from the maximum extent of the aphelion cloud belt. Aside from passing diffuse water ice clouds, conditions were storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

11 August 2014 – 17 August 2014 released: 20 August 2014

Skies remained storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site at Gale Crater.

 

18 August 2014 – 24 August 2014 released: 27 August 2014

Skies were storm free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

25 August 2014 – 31 August 2014 released: 3 September 2014

Skies remained relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

1 September 2014 – 7 September 2014 released: 10 September 2014

Storm activity was relatively quiet, including at the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

8 September 2014 – 14 September 2014 released: 17 September 2014

Skies were storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

15 September 2014 – 21 September 2014 released: 24 September 2014

Skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

22 September 2014 – 28 September 2014 released: 1 October 2014

Afternoon conditions for the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater were storm free.

 

29 September 2014 – 5 October 2014 released: 8 October 2014

Despite dust-lifting activity elsewhere on the planet, skies remained storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

6 October 2014 – 12 October 2014 released: 15 October 2014

Despite the dust-lifting activity occurring elsewhere on the planet, the Opportunity rover in Meridiani was encountering elevated levels of atmospheric dust, while Curiosity in Gale Crater remained relatively isolated from the storms.

 

20 October 2014 – 26 October 2014 released: 29 October 2014

The widespread dust-lifting activity raised global atmospheric opacities to annual highs, as recorded by the Opportunity rover in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater. While Curiosity experienced increased atmospheric opacities, it was largely spared from direct contact with storms. However Opportunity, just off to the east of the Acidalia storm-track, was less fortunate and experienced extremely hazy skies due to its proximity to areas of dust-lifting along the cross-equatorial storm track.

Was opacity great enough to imply that this was not a sunny day?

10 November 2014 – 16 November 2014 released: 19 November 2014

Skies remained clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.

 

24 November 2014 – 30 November 2014 released: 3 December 2014

The Opportunity rover in Meridiani  and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater both continued to experience seasonally elevated dust levels in the atmosphere compared to previous Martian years, despite that, skies over both sites continued to remain storm-free.

Was opacity great enough to imply that this was not a sunny day?

1 December 2014 – 7 December 2014 released: 10 December 2014

Both the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced dusty but storm-free skies.

Was opacity great enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

8 December 2014 – 14 December 2014 released: 17 December 2014

The Curiosity rover in Gale Crater and the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum operated in storm-free conditions.

 

15 December 2014 – 21 December 2014 released: 24 December 2014

Afternoon skies over both the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater and the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum continued to be storm-free.

 

22 December 2014 – 28 December 2014 released: 31 December 2014

Both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free afternoon skies throughout the week.

 

29 December 2014 – 4 January 2015 released: 7 January 2015

Last week on Mars, a local scale dust storm was observed originating out of western Elysium tracking southward towards Gale Crater. After reaching and partially obscuring Gale Crater, the storm quickly abated. The Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced elevated levels of atmospheric opacity during that time.

Was opacity great enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

5 January 2015 – 11 January 2015 released: 14 January 2015

Both the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater and the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

19 January 2015 – 25 January 2015 released: 28 January 2015

Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

26 January 2015 – 1 February 2015 released: 4 February 2015

Both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

2 February 2015 – 8 February 2015 released: 11 February 2015

Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each afternoon.

 

9 February 2015 – 15 February 2015 released: 18 February 2015

Conditions were storm-free each afternoon over both the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater.

 

23 February 2015 – 1 March 2015 released: 4 March 2015

Skies continued to remain clear and storm-free over both rover sites, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum.

 

30 March 2015 – 5 April 2015 released: 8 April 2015

As a result of all the storm activity during the past couple of weeks, both the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater and the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum experienced dustier skies.

Was opacity great enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

6 April 2015 – 12 April 2015 released: 15 April 2015

The rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies and seasonal dust levels on par with previous Martian years.

 

20 April 2015 – 26 April 2015 released: 29 April 2015

The Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum experienced dusty skies associated with regional activity. The Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater continued to be storm-free throughout the week.

 

27 April 2015 – 3 May 2015 released: 6 May 2015

At tropical latitudes, skies over the Opportunity rover remained dusty throughout the week, while Curiosity experienced storm-free skies.

 

4 May 2015 – 10 May 2015 released: 13 May 2015

While dust proceeded to settle out of the skies near the Opportunity rover on Meridiani, the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced relatively clear skies.

 

4 May 2015 – 10 May 2015 released: 13 May 2015

Both the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

18 May 2015 – 24 May 2015 released: 27 May 2015

Throughout the week, skies continued to clear over for the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater and the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum.

 

25 May 2015 – 31 May 2015 released: 3 June 2015

 

The rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies as the equatorial latitudes continued to be relatively calm each sol.

 

22 June 2015 – 28 June 2015 released: 1 July 2015

Storm-free conditions persisted over the two rover sites, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum.

 

29 June 2015 – 5 July 2015 released: 8 July 2015

Both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free each sol.

 

6 July 2015 – 12 July 2015 released: 15 July 2015

No dust storm activity was observed in the equatorial latitudes where both rovers, Curiosity and Opportunity explore.

 

13 July 2015 – 19 July 2015 released: 22 July 2015

Both robotic explorers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

20 July 2015 – 26 July 2015 released: 29 July 2015

Last week, as the southern autumn/ northern spring seasons progressed on Mars, dust storms were kicked-up at mid-to-high southern latitudes. During this time, the northern plains experienced eastward propagating water-ice clouds and dust storms as the seasonal ice cap continued to defrost. Towards the end of the week, an arcuate shaped dust storm developed over northern Utopia. Afternoon water-ice clouds were observed in the low latitudes over large volcanoes and other topographic highs each sol. Despite all the dust activity in the northern and southern regions, both the Opportunity rover on Meridiani and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater continued to encounter storm-free skies.

 

3 August 2015 – 9 August 2015 released: 12 August 2015

Both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Merdiani Planum experienced storm-free skies as dust lifting events were confined to mid and high latitudes.

 

10 August 2015 – 16 August 2015 released: 19 August 2015

Skies remained storm-free over the rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater each sol.

 

17 August 2015 – 23 August 2015 released: 26 August 2015

The Opportunity rover site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater continued to have storm-free weather during the afternoon hours.

 

24 August 2015 – 30 August 2015 released: 2 September 2015

The robotic explorers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

31 August 2015 – 6 September 2015 released: 9 September 2015

Skies were storm-free for both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater each sol.

 

7 September 2015 – 13 September 2015 released: 16 September 2015

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

21 September 2015 – 27 September 2015 released: 30 September 2015

The robotic explorers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free conditions throughout the week.

 

28 September 2015 – 4 October 2015 released: 7 October 2015

Both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

5 October 2015 – 11 October 2015 released: 14 October 2015

The rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free conditions throughout the week.

 

12 October 2015 – 18 October 2015 released: 21 October 2015

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

19 October 2015 – 25 October 2015 released: 28 October 2015

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

26 October 2015 – 1 November 2015 released: 4 November 2015

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

2 November 2015 – 8 November 2015 released: 11 November 2015

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies at the beginning and end of the week. The long gap in coverage between November 3 and November 7th was due to a planned shutoff of the MARCI camera

 

9 November 2015 – 15 November 2015 released: 18 November 2015

The rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

16 November 2015 – 22 November 2015 released: 25 November 2015

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

23 November 2015 – 29 November 2015 released: 2 December 2015

Condensate water-ice clouds, associated with the developing aphelion cloud-belt, dominated the afternoon equatorial skies. Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each afternoon.

Were the afternoon clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

30 November 2015 – 6 December 2015 released: 9 December 2015

Condensate water-ice clouds, associated with the aphelion cloud-belt, dominated the skies at equatorial latitudes last week. Small short-lived dust storms were observed over Meridiani. Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free throughout the week.

Were the clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

7 December 2015 – 13 December 2015 released: 16 December 2015

For the past week on Mars, the aphelion cloud-belt continued to develop at equatorial latitudes. Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

Were the clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

14 December 2015 – 20 December 2015 released: 23 December 2015

The Martian aphelion cloud-belt continued to dominate the afternoon skies over low latitudes last week. Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

Were the afternoon clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

21 December 2015 – 27 December 2015 released: 30 December 2015

The aphelion cloud-belt continued to expand its presence of water-ice clouds over equatorial regions. During the second half of the week, a couple small short-lived dust storms were observed over eastern Meridiani.  21 December 2015 and 27 December 2015Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol. Seasons change next week as Northern Summer / Southern Winter arrive for the planet.

Were the clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

4 January 2016 – 10 January 2016 released: 13 January 2016

Each afternoon, the widespread aphelion cloud-belt prevailed over the equatorial regions. Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

11 January 2016 – 17 January 2016 released: 20 January 2016

An occasion small transient dust storm could be observed to the west and east of the Opportunity Rover site. However, afternoon skies above both the Opportunity rover on Meridiani and the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater continued to remain storm-free throughout the week.

 

18 January 2016 – 24 January 2016 released: 27 January 2016

Further equator ward, the aphelion cloud-belt was prominent in the afternoon sky.

 

25 January 2016 – 31 January 2016 released: 3 February 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free afternoon skies.

Were the mornings not storm free?

1 February 2016 – 7 February 2016 released: 10 February 2016

The aphelion cloud-belt, composed of diffuse water-ice aerosols, prevailed over the mid-to-low latitudes of the red planet last week. Afternoon skies were storm-free each sol over both the Opportunity site in Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 Were the afternoon clouds enough to imply that this was not a sunny day? 

8 February 2016 – 14 February 2016 released: 17 February 2016

The collection of condensate water-ice clouds strewn across the equatorial regions referred to as the aphelion cloud-belt, continued to be the most prominent weather feature on Mars this past week. Storm-free skies persisted over the rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavor Crater.

Were the condensate water-ice clouds strewn across the equatorial regions enough to keep the days from being sunny?

15 February 2016 – 21 February 2016 released: 24 February 2016

Apart from condensate clouds over Meridiani and Gale, skies were relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site in Endeavor Crater and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

Were the condensate clouds enough to keep the sols from being sunny?

22 February 2016 – 28 February 2016 released: 2 March 2016

Across the equatorial latitudes the aphelion cloud-belt endured each afternoon. The six-wheeled robotic explorers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

29 February 2016 – 6 March 2016 released: 9 March 2016

At tropical latitudes, water-ice clouds of the aphelion cloud-belt persisted each afternoon, with occasional afternoon cloud cover observed over the Opportunity rover site. Both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

7 March 2016 – 13 March 2016 released: 16 March 2016

Condensate water-ice clouds associated with the aphelion cloud-belt were widespread over equatorial regions. Skies above the rovers, Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free each afternoon.

 

14 March 2016 – 20 March 2016 released: 23 March 2016

Though the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani experienced some scattered water-ice cloud cover, both rovers Opportunity and Curiosity experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

21 March 2016 – 27 March 2016 released: 30 March 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

28 March 2016 – 3 April 2016 released: 6 April 2016

Looking to the equatorial regions, condensate water-ice clouds associated with the aphelion cloud-belt prevailed each afternoon. Scattered water-ice clouds were also present over the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani on multiple sols. Despite the slight increase in dust activity, both rovers, Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

4 April 2016 – 10 April 2016 released: 13 April 2016

Despite a couple very small (local-scale) transient dust storms over eastern Meridiani, the rovers, Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

11 April 2016 – 17 April 2016 released: 20 April 2016

Over the equatorial latitudes, condensate water-ice clouds associated with the now waning aphelion cloud-belt were observed. Despite the increase in dust storm activity, both rovers, Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

18 April 2016 – 24 April 2016 released: 27 April 2016

At low latitudes, diffuse water-ice clouds associated with the aphelion cloud-belt persisted through each afternoon. Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

25 April 2016 – 1 May 2016 released: 4 May 2016

Looking to the equatorial latitudes, condensate water-ice clouds were still widespread, though less continuous over many regions. Though the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani experienced some scattered water-ice cloud cover, both robotic explorers, Opportunity and Curiosity experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

2 May 2016 – 8 May 2016 released: 11 May 2016

Despite the surge in storm activity, both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

9 May 2016 – 15 May 2016 released: 18 May 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

16 May 2016 – 22 May 2016 released: 25 May 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

23 May 2016 – 29 May 2016 released: 1 June 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free throughout the week.

 

30 May 2016 – 5 June 2016 released: 8 June 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater were storm-free each sol.

 

6 June 2016 – 12 June 2016 released: 15 June 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

27 June 2016 – 3 July 2016 released: 6 July 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free each sol.

 

4 July 2016 – 10 July 2016 released: 13 July 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

11 July 2016 – 17 July 2016 released: 20 July 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

18 July 2016 – 24 July 2016 released: 27 July 2016

Skies remained relatively clear over the Opportunity rover site on Meridiani Planum and the Curiosity rover site in Gale Crater.

 

25 July 2016 – 31 July 2016 released: 3 August 2016

Water-ice clouds continued to dominate the afternoon skies over tropical latitudes, including all the major shield volcanoes. The rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

1 August 2016 – 7 August 2016 released: 10 August 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

8 August 2016 – 14 August 2016 released: 17 August 2016

Skies above the rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free all week.

 

15 August 2016 – 21 August 2016 released: 24 August 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free each sol.

 

22 August 2016 – 28 August 2016 released: 31 August 2016

Though the Opportunity rover encountered some elevated levels of atmospheric dust, both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free each afternoon.

 

29 August 2016 – 4 September 2016 released: 7 September 2016

The Opportunity rover site in Meridiani experienced dustier conditions early in the week, but gradually became less dusty as the week progressed. During that same period, the Curiosity site in Gale remained storm-free.

 

5 September 2016 – 11 September 2016 released: 14 September 2016

Despite the dust activity north and south of the equator, both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies.

 

12 September 2016 – 18 September 2016 released: 21 September 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies.

 

19 September 2016 – 25 September 2016 released: 28 September 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies.

 

26 September 2016 – 2 October 2016 released: 5 October 2016

The Curiosity rover site did experience some elevated atmospheric dust levels due to the dust activity over Elysium Planitia, while the Opportunity rover on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free conditions each afternoon

Were thedust levels at Curiosity enough to keep the days from being sunny?

3 October 2016 – 9 October 2016 released: 12 October 2016

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

10 October 2016 – 16 October 2016 released: 19 October 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies each afternoon.

 

17 October 2016 – 23 October 2016 released: 26 October 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

24 October 2016 – 30 October 2016 released: 2 November 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

31 October 2016 – 6 November 2016 released: 9 November 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

7 November 2016 – 13 November 2016 released: 16 November 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the wee

 

14 November 2016 – 20 November 2016 released: 23 November 2016

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free conditions each afternoon.

 

21 November 2016 – 27 November 2016 released: 30 November 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

28 November 2016 – 4 December 2016 released: 7 December 2016

Water-ice clouds over the low latitudes were slightly more abundant this past week as the diminished dust storm activity correlated with cooler atmospheric conditions. Both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

5 December 2016 – 11 December 2016 released: 14 December 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

12 December 2016 – 18 December 2016 released: 21 December 2016

Skies above the rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater were storm-free throughout the week.

 

19 December 2016 – 25 December 2016 released: 28 December 2016

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

26 December 2016 – 1 January 2017 released: 4 January 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies each afternoon.

 

2 January 2017 – 8 January 2017 released: 11 January 2017

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free throughout the week.

 

9 January 2017 – 15 January 2017 released: 18 January 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

16 January 2017 – 22 January 2017 released: 25 January 2017

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater were storm-free throughout the week.

 

23 January 2017 – 29 January 2017 released: 1 February 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

30 January 2017 – 5 February 2017 released: 8 February 2017

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

6 February 2017 – 12 February 2017 released: 15 February 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater did not confront any dust storms this past week.

 

13 February 2017 – 19 February 2017 released: 22 February 2017

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

27 February 2017 – 5 March 2017 released: 8 March 2017

Equatorial water-ice clouds were at a minimum this past week due to the warmer and dustier conditions. As a result of the recent storm activity, the Opportunity rover site continued to experience higher atmospheric opacities. Meanwhile, the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater encountered seasonal dust levels on par with previous martian years.

Were the dust levels enough to keep the days from being sunny?

6 March 2017 – 12 March 2017 released: 15 March 2017

Curiosity rover in Gale Crater experienced storm-free but dusty skies while Opportunity felt the impact of the nearby regional storm throughout the week.

Were the dust levels enough to keep the days from being sunny? What was the nature of the regional storm? Was it a dust storm, a windy storm, or a storm with clouds? 

13 March 2017 – 19 March 2017 released: 22 March 2017

As a result of the dust activity to the west, elevated atmospheric opacities continued for the Opportunity rover site in Endeavour Crater. The Curiosity rover in Gale Crater encountered dust levels typical for this time of Mars year.

Gale Crater encountered dust levels typical for this time of Mars year. We need a definition of typical in term sof opacity.

20 March 2017 – 26 March 2017 released: 29 March 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

27 March 2017 – 2 April 2017 released: 5 April 2017

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

3 April 2017 – 9 April 2017 released: 12 April 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free each sol.

 

10 April 2017 – 16 April 2017 released: 19 April 2017

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

24 April 2017 – 30 April 2017 released: 3 May 2017

Opportunity on Meridiani Planum and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies all week.

 

1 May 2017 – 7 May 2017 released: 10 May 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free conditions each sol.

 

8 May 2017 – 14 May 2017 released: 17 May 2017

Opportunity in Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

15 May 2017 – 21 May 2017 released: 24 May 2017

Skies above the rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum were storm-free each sol.

 

22 May 2017 – 28 May 2017 released: 31 May 2017

Each afternoon, both rovers, Opportunity in Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies.

 

29 May 2017 – 4 June 2017 released: 7 June 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Meridiani encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

5 June 2017 – 11 June 2017 released: 14 June 2017

Skies over both rover sites, Meridiani Planum and Gale Crater were storm-free each sol.

 

12 June 2017 – 18 June 2017 released: 21 June 2017

At the end of the week, scattered water-ice clouds were observed just east of the Opportunity rover site. Both rover sites, Gale Crater and Meridiani Planum were storm-free each afternoon.

 

19 June 2017 – 25 June 2017 released: 28 June 2017

Opportunity in Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater experienced storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

26 June 2017 – 2 July 2017 released: 5 July 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

3 July 2017 – 9 July 2017 released: 12 July 2017

Though the Opportunity rover site in Meridiani experienced some scattered water-ice cloud cover, both rovers, Opportunity and Curiosity explored under storm-free skies each afternoon.

 

10 July 2017 – 16 July 2017 released: 19 July 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

17 July 2017 – 23 July 2017 released: 26 July 2017

Diffuse water-ice clouds associated with the aphelion cloud-belt continued to be more dominant over the mid-to-low latitudes each afternoon. Storm-free skies persisted over the rovers, Opportunity in Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater throughout the week.

 

31 July 2017 – 6 August 2017 released: 9 August 2017

Diffuse afternoon water-ice clouds were strewn across many low-latitude regions as the aphelion cloud-belt continued to take hold. Both rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity on Meridiani Planum experienced storm-free skies each sol.

 

7 August 2017 – 13 August 2017 released: 16 August 2017

Opportunity in Meridiani and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies throughout the week.

 

14 August 2017 – 20 August 2017 released: 23 August 2017

Diffuse water-ice clouds continued to accumulate over tropical latitudes and the major shield volcanoes. Skies over the rovers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater remained storm-free all week.

 

21 August 2017 – 27 August 2017 released: 30 August 2017

Condensate water-ice clouds associated with the aphelion cloud-belt continued to slowly converge over the equatorial latitudes each sol. Both rovers, Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies each afternoon.

 

28 August 2017 – 3 September 2017 released: 6 September 2017

Condensate clouds associated with the developing aphelion cloud-belt were observed across the tropics of both hemispheres. The robotic explorers, Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavour Crater experienced storm-free skies all week.

 

4 September 2017 – 10 September 2017 released: 13 September 2017

Curiosity in Gale Crater and Opportunity in Endeavor Crater experienced scattered water ice cloud cover throughout the week, but remained free of any afternoon dust storm activity.

Curiosity experienced scattered water ice cloud cover throughout the week, but remained free of any afternoon dust storm activity. Ice clouds are different from dust. Was it or was it not sunny in the morning?

18 September 2017 – 24 September 2017 released: 27 September 2017

Opportunity in Endeavour Crater and Curiosity in Gale Crater encountered storm-free skies each sol.

 

18 September 2017 – 24 September 2017 released: 27 September 2017

 

Gale Crater and Endeavour Crater remained storm-free.

 

 

 

PS -Thanks to Level 3 Communications, Drake Holding Company and DoD for your continued interest in our research.