Contents for Mars Correct - Critque of All NASA Mars Weather Data

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APRIL 7, 2019: BASIC REPORT for MARS CORRECT – CRITIQUE OF ALL NASA MARS WEATHER DATA

 

                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS                                             

Table of Contents…………………………………………………………..

iii

List of Illustrations…................................................................................

iv

ABSTRACT………………………………………………………………………………

1

1. INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………..........................

2

   1.1 Comparison of Martian and terrestrial dust devils

3

     1.1.1 Geographic Occurrences and the Greenhouse and Thermophoresis Effect

3

     1.1.2 Seasonal Occurrences and Electrical Properties

4

     1.1.3. Size and Shape

4

     1.1.4. Diurnal Formation Rate and Lifetime

4

     1.1.5 Wind Speeds

4

     1.1.6 Core Temperature Excursions

4

     1.1.7 Dust Particle Size – The Problem of Martian Dust <2 Microns and Wind Speeds.

4

     1.1.8. Core Pressure Excursions 

5

   1.2. NASA Ames Test of Martian Pressures and Dust Devils

8

2. OVERVIEW OF PRESSURE INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS

9

   2.1 Viking 2 and Gay-Lussac’s Law

11

   2.2 Pathfinder and Phoenix Pressure Issues

16

   2.3. Which Transducers Were Used?

19

   2.4. Issues Raised by the FMI

21

2.5. DID ANY TAVIS OR VAISALA TRANSDUCERS PEG OUT AT THEIR MAXIMUM PRESSURES?

27

    2.5.1 How extraordinary was the (temporary) 1,149 Pa pressure spike of MSL Sol 370?

27

     2.5.2. The importance of gleaning data from identification of our web site readers.

28

    2.5.3 Why is it so wrong to alter data to fit an expected curve? 

34

   2.6 The Dust filter on Viking

38

      2.6.1. The issue of Viking pressure reports and digitization

38

     2.6.2. The issue of daily pressure spikes at consistent time-bins.

39

2.7. MSL Weather Reporting Fiasco

44

3. CAVES ON AND SPIRAL CLOUDS ABOVE ARSIA MONS AND OLYMPUS MONS ON MARS.

47

4. THE ISSUES OF SNOW, WATER ICE, AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON MARS.

49

   4.1. Annual Pressure Fluctuations Recorded by Viking 1, Viking 2, and Phoenix -   Maximum Pressure in the Northern Winter?

49

4.1.1. Ls of minimum pressure

50

4.1.2. Ls of maximum pressure

50

5. RADIO OCCULTATION

63

5.1 Shifting Standards – The Relationship of the MOLA Topography of Mars to the Mean Atmospheric Pressure.  

65

6.  SPECTROSCOPY PRESSURE READINGS BY MARS EXPRESS ORBITER.

69

7.  MARTIAN WIND PROBLEMS

70

   7.1 Anemometer/Telltale Wind Speed Issues

71

   7.2 Martian Bedforms – Too Much Movement of Sand Dunes and Ripples for 6.1 mbar

72

   7.2.1 Issues Raised by the paper on Planet-wide sand motion on Mars by Bridges et al. (2012)

73

8. DO DOWNRANGE LANDINGS MEAN THINNER OR THICKER AIR?

79

9. DUST OPACITY AND PRESSURE

83

10. EXCESSIVE DECELERATION DURING AEROBRAKING OPERATIONS

90

   10.1 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS)

90

   10.2 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)

91

11. THE GLOBAL DUST STORM OF 2018

92

   11.1 Pressures Claimed for the 2018 Global Dust Storm

95

   11.2 Brief Summary of 2018 Dust Storm Data

106

   11.3 Possibility of a Biological Factor in Lifting Dust

106

   11.3.1 Martian Dust Storm Seasons

107

   11.4 Martian Dust Storm Paths and Radioactive Areas

107

12. MARS PATHFINDER PRESSURES

109

13. THE POTENTIAL PRESSURE ON MARS

111

   13.1 Did NASA ever publicly back 20 mbar on Mars?

111

   13.2 Biology, Methane, and a Possible Hint of the Real Martian Air Pressure

112

   13.3 Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL), Perchlorates and Running Water on Mars

116

     13.3.1 Length of daylight where RSL are found.

116

     13.3.2 Latitudes, times and temperatures for evidence of running water

118

     13.3.3 The role of perchlorates in RSL

119

    13.4 Other Water on Mars – the Frozen Sea at Utopia Planitia

121

   13.5 The High End of Pressure Estimates for Mars

125

   13.6. Pressure Drop as MSL Climbs Mt. Sharp vs. Scale Height Predictions.

129

14. RELATIVE HUMIDITY

138

15. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT CONCERNS

141

    15.1. Ground Temperature Problems

143

    15.2. Winter Ground Temperatures above freezing in MSL Year 2

150

    15.3. Why the early winter ground temperatures are so important and possible life seen on Sol 1185

150

     15.3.1 Evidence of Life on Mars.

152

    15.4. MSL Air and Ground Temperature Differences.

156

        15.4.1. Oxygen Solubility in near-surface Martian environments and aerobic life.

158

    15.5. MSL Diurnal Temperature Variations

160

       15.5.1. Why does the temperature fall more degrees at MSL in summer nights than winter nights?

164

   15.6. Probable Failure of the Ground Temperature Sensor or Personnel Issues?

164

      15.6.1 Failure of the Temperature Sensor.

171

      15.6.2 Personnel Issues.

171

      15.6.3 Mixed messages about the range and sensitivity of pressure sensors sent to Mars.

173

      15.6.4. A Possible Excuse for REMS Errors.

178

    15.7  Temperature, Pressure and Albedo

179

16. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND CLOUD COVER AT MSL.

183

16.1 Solar Longitude for sols at MSL with very high and low ultraviolet radiation.

185

17. CRASH OF THE EXOMARS 2016 SCHIAPARELLI LANDER

194

      17.1 ESA gets smarter – Raises ExoMars orbit due to excessive density of Mars’s atmosphere

197

18. CONCLUSIONS

199

19. RECOMMENDATIONS

206

20. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

207

AFTERWORD: What difference could this all possibly make? 

208

21. REFERENCES

214

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE BASIC REPORT

FIGURE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Arsia Mons dust devils

3

2

Utah dust devil pressure drop

5

3

Pressure drops at Phoenix and Pathfinder

6

4

Relative magnitude of 0.62 mbar increase in pressure for Viking 1 at its sol 332.3 and pressure drops or 79 convective vortices/dust devils at Mars pathfinder

7

5A

First photo from the surface of Mars and dust kicked up

10

5B

Rocks on the deck of the MSL Curiosity

10

6

Pressure calculator with Gay-Lussac Pressure Law and Viking 2 results.

12

7

Prediction success totals per time-bin and corresponding % of successful predictions.

13

8

Sample of Annex F – Viking 1 daily pressure predictions & measurements with cyclic accuracies for pressure predictions

14

9A-9C

Relationship of temperature changes to pressure changes on Viking 2

15

10A

Tavis Viking CAD Diagram 10011

17

10B

Tavis Pathfinder CAD Diagram 10484

18

10C

Three different Tavis transducers

19

10D

Tavis was used on both Pathfinder and Insight

20

11A

Vaisala 10484 pressure transducer on Phoenix and MSL

21

11B

Relative size of dust filters for Mars landers

22

12A

Pressure and Temperatures Recorded by Phoenix

23

12B

Except for Sol 370 the black MSL pressure curve is suspiciously too close to the Viking 2 curve above it and the Viking 1 curve below it. 

24

13

Quality control Individuals test.

27

14A

MSL sensor pegged out at max pressure

30

14B

MSL pressure sols 369-371

29

14C

The REMS team alters the critical MSL Sol 370 pressure data

31

14D

Ashima Research has not yet altered the critical MSL Sol 370 pressure data

31

14E

REMS also alters pressures for Sols 1160 and 1161.

32

14F

REMS again revises pressures for Sols 1300 and 1301.

33

14G

REMS alters temperature data too when it is off the curve.

34

15A

MSL REMS Block Diagram

35

15B

Real Mars Sky Color

35

16A

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 to .34 time-bins. Sols 1-116.

40

16B

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 134 -199.

40

16C

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 200-219.

40

16D

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 220-304

40

16E

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 305-334

41

16F

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 335-350

41

16G

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 156-175

41

16H

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 176-199.

41

16I

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 201-260.

42

16J

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 261-290.

42

16K

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 291- 305.

42

16L

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 306-361

42

17A

REMS Team data confusion

45

17B

Data day length and wind report changes from Ashima Research due to our efforts

45

18A-D

Inverse relationship between MSL pressures and temperatures

46

19

Caves on Arsia Mons

48

20

Spiral clouds over Arsia Mons and Olympus Mons

48

21A

1,177Pa and 1,200 Pa maximum pressures published

51

21B

Approximate display of how MSL pressure data fits in with VL-2, VL-1 and Phoenix data. 

52

22A

Ashima Research does not support exact minimum MSL pressures published by the REMS Team

53

22B

REMS plays games with the minimum pressure so far for MSL Year 3 on Sol 2002.

56

23

Pressure curve for MSL’s first 866 sols.

60

24

Radio Occultation Points on Mars with locations of Olympus Mons and Arsia Mons indicated

67

25

MOLA map of Mars with topographic features, landing sites, and methane plumes

68

26A

Mars Express OMEGA spectroscopy-derive surface pressures

69

26B

Four years of in situ pressures at Viking 1 lander site

69

27

Phoenix telltale waving in Martian wind

72

28

Wind speeds recorded at Viking 1 for its sols 1 to 116 and 134 to 350

75

29

Wind speeds recorded at Viking 2 for its sols 1 to 399

76

30

Erasure of Spirit’s tracks during the 2007 global dust storm

77

31

Dust Storms and pressures recorded at Vikings 1 and 2.

78

32

Reconstructed density for Spirit landing

80

33

Reconstructed density for  Opportunity entry

80

34

Reconstructed density for Phoenix entry

81

35

Dust storm in  Phoenix, Arizona

82

36

Sols 852 to 858 REMS vs. Malin

83

37

Opacity changes at Opportunity from sols 1205 to 1235.

89

38

VL1 pressure and opacity

90

39

Actual Dynamic Pressure – normalized to an altitude of 121 km

91

40

2019 Global Dust Storm Sols 2082 to 2090

93

41

2018 Global Dust Storm blacks out the sun at Opportunity

94

42

Two images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity rover depict the change in the color of light illuminating the Martian surface

95

43

The altitude from – July 26, 2016 to October 15, 2016 was somewhere between 4,400 meters in July to 4,360 meters below areoid.

96

44

Possible correlation between radioactive hot spots and dust storm origination on Mars?

108

45

Time-averaged surface pressures for 30 sols of Pathfinder

109

46

Diurnal pressure cycle for MSL Sol  10 and MPF Sols 9 and 10

110

47

History of beliefs about Martian Atmospheric Pressure

112

48

Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)

113

49

Methane spikes seen by MSL at Gale Crater.

114

50A-I plus Plates 5 and 6

The Color of the Martian Sky

115

51

Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL)

117

52

Location of RSL on Mars

118

53

Projected surface and subsurface temperature to 10 cm depth at Melas Chasma

119

54

Relation between temperature, season & direction for RSL at Melas Chasma

119

55

Spectroscopy, RSL & perchlorates/Perchlorates and boiling point on Mars

121

56

Map of Utopia Planitia where a water ice sea was found on Mars

123

57

Pressure predictions based on stratus clouds 16 km over Mars Pathfinder

128

58

Gale Crater topographic map

131

59

Comparison of scale heights in The Martian Climate Revisited and on a NASA web site.

134

60

Comparison of pressure readings by Viking 1, Viking 2, Mars Phoenix, and MSL

137

61

Relative humidity is missing from REMS weather reports

138

62

Relative humidity claims for Gale crater

139

63

Relative humidity in the blast zone, arriving at Rocknest, leaving Rocknest and at Glenelg in Gale Crater.

  140

64

The REMS Team drops above freezing temperatures to below freezing

142

65

Huge uncertainty of MSL ground temperatures

143

66

MSL temperature sensor range

145

67

MSL ground temperature sensor

146

68

Mars Science Laboratory high air and ground temperatures for 3+ Martian years.

147

69

Mars Science Laboratory low air and ground temperatures for 3+ Martian years.

148

70

Unaveraged periodic temperature data from Mars Pathfinder (0.25 meters to 1 meter height)

149

71

The green spherical and cocoon-like objects seen on sols 1185 and 1189. The green spheres might be photosynthetic life.

151

72

The putative ooids found in the same area as the spheres shown on Figure 57A might be simply smaller versions of the same phenonena.

153

73

Elevations and ground temperatures encountered while MSL was at positions noted by JPL. Possible life was seen on Sol 1185, along with a warmer than expected high ground temperature. The position noted for MSL for Sol 1248 is a return to within 20 meters of where the potential life was seen before. Then it moved within about 10 meters of the site.

154

74

Some of the unusually warm ground temperatures including five above freezing seen early in MSL Year 2 Winter.

155

75A

Diurnal drop in high temperatures from the ground up to 1.5 meters above ground level at MSL

156

75B

Graph of temperature drops at MSL for its summer (Year 2) and Winter (Year 2 to 3)

156

76

Location of meteorological sensors on Booms 1 and 2 of MSL.

159

77

While low air temperatures for sols 1670 and 1671 were both -76° C, the ground temperature lows differed by 30° C.

163

78

Sols 1720 to 1721 – Record low of -136° C.

163

79

Results from Spectroscopy when matching RSL with perchlorates

164

80

MSL Sols 1717 to 1721 topography with altitudes below areoid with low air and ground temperatures posted by the REMS Team.

166

81

JPL identified positions and MOLA altitudes for sols 1639 to 1671.  Low air and ground temperatures were added based on REMS Team weather reports.

167

82

 JPL published the positions for MSL Sols 1635, 1636, 1639, 1642, 1643, 1645, 1646, 1648 and 1649. During these dates low ground temperatures varied between -79° and -93° C. However, the dates that they did not show had ground temperature lows that varied from -80° and -111° C with five temperatures colder than -101° C, the coldest temperature ever observed by MSL.

168

83

Alteration of REMS Team report for Sol 1605 after we questioned it.

It is quite apparent that before March, 2017 reports that vary too  much from the preceding day or previous Martian year at the same Ls do not survive long at the REMS site at  http://cab.inta-csic.es/rems/en

  172

84

Viking 1 and Viking 2 error in unit conversion

174

85

The REMS Team would not permit low temperatures warmer than -50°  C.

175

86

Print-screen (recorded on July 23, 2017) of the FMI Abstract entitled Pressure and Humidity Measurements at the MSL Landing Site Supported by Modeling of the Atmospheric Conditions.

  176

87

The Vaisla Pressure sensor and its range as depicted by Spaceflight101.com. (1150 Pa top pressure)

177

88

REMS puts out a new maximum pressure for MSL. This time it’s 1400 Pa (14 mbar).

178

89

Maximum temperature calculated according to Boltzman’s Law with TES measurements from the equator to -10° latitude (10° South latitude)

 

 

179

90

Combining day and night infrared shooting, I have obtained this map in false colors where red spots area areas that tend to warm up more quickly during the day, while green resembles areas that tend to retain more warmth overnight, everything else is shown in blue.

181

91

Ls of Mars when MSL was experiencing low UV or very high UV.

186

92

Initial low UV values reported by the REMS Team and how the reports were altered. All low UV values between Sol 608 (April 22, 2014) and Sol 1200 on December 22, 2015 were obliterated by February 22, 2016.

188

93

After the REMS Team (a) dropped all UV values and (b) read our concerns about their behavior they changed at least 12 sols back to low UV. See Figure 77B for the rest of such changes.

189

94

After the REMS Team (a) dropped all UV values and (b) read our concerns about their behavior they changed at least 12 sols back to low UV. Figure 77B shows such changes that were not documented on Figure 77A

   190

95

Not all changes away from low UV were restored. As of October 12, 2017 no such restoration has made yet for Sol 1006.

191

96

Sunny skies advertised for MSL Sols 82 to 88 were not backed by the MSSS MARCI images

193

97

ESA gets smarter – Raises ExoMars orbit due to excessive density of Mars’s atmosphere

198

98

Changes in sky color and opacity due to the dust storm at MSL between May and June 2018.

203

 

TABLES IN THE BASIC REPORT

TABLE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Pressure at various elevations on Mars based on a scale height of 10.8 and a pressure at Mars Areoid of 6.1 mbar. 

8

2

Viking 1 cyclic accuracies for pressure predictions.

12

3

Pressures revised by JPL/MSL after we highlighted them

25-26

4A

Sample of how the Mars Correct team tracks weather data published by the REMS Team/JPL

37

4B

Digitization limitations and the specific pressures reported by VL-2 for its first summer on Mars

39

5

Viking 1 Time-bin pressure and temperature change studies

43

6

Viking 2 Time-bin pressure and temperature change studies                                                                                        

44

7

Pressures @ LS 90 and minimum pressures seen by VL-1, VL-2 and MS8

54

8

Landers and expected pressures based on landing altitude

54

9

Comparison of Viking 1 and Viking 2 Pressures for Ls 270

58

10

Variations in day length at Ls 70 South

59

11

Comparison of Martian Pressures via Radio Occultation & Calculated Scale Height Calculations

63

12

Six attempts by Mariners 4, 6 and 7 to measure pressure by radio occultation.

65

13

Profile of the windiest Viking day on Mars

74

14

Extracts of the MSSS reports that mention cloudy or dusty weather at the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater, Mars, and weather in equatorial regions where Curiosity is found.  

84-88

15A

MSL Sols, Ls and Altitude in Meters Below Areoid

97

15B

REMS weather data for the 2018 Global Dust Storm

99-102

15C

Length of Sols on Mars at key solar longitudes related to dust storms

107

16

Calculation For Pressure At Utopia Planitia (Based on 6.1 mbar at areoid)

 

122

17

Pressure and altitudes for MSL Years 2 and 3 between Ls 11 and 19

130

18A

Pressure calculations for altitudes discussed above using a scale height of 10.8 km

132

18B

Pressure calculations for altitudes discussed above using a scale height of 11.1 km

133

19

Pressures over 925 Pa revised by JPL/REMS after we highlighted them or published them in earlier version of our Report

135

20

MSL temperatures altered by the REMS Team in July, 2013

141

21

Usually warm ground temperatures early in the winter of MSL year 2

151

22

Coldest air and ground temperatures for the first 29 Martian months of MSL operations on mars

161

23

MSL maximum and minimum air and ground temperatures Sols 1634 to 1684

169-170

24

Initial ultraviolet radiation reported through 1,256 sols at MSL. 

183

25

UV radiation reported up to Sol 1,338 after the REMS Team dropped all 19 original low UV values and then restored 12 of them.

184

26

UV for 2,007 MSL sols

185

27

Weather at MSL for Sols 2080 to 2097 during the  2018 Global Dust Storm

196-197

 

ANNEXES (with links) AND APPENDICES

 

SECTION

TOPIC

PAGE

Annex Abstract

Overview of data in the Annexes

A-1

ANNEX A

VIKING 1 MORNING PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE CHANGES and Mars Time-Bin Clock.

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20A%203%20SEP%202013.pdf

A-2 to

A-59

ANNEX A Appendix 1

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 to .34 time-bins. Sols 1-116.

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20A%203%20SEP%202013.pdf

A-3 to A-22

Appendix 2

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 134-199.

A-23 to

A-34

Appendix 3

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 200-219.

A-35 to A-38

Appendix 4

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 220-304

A-39 to    A-50

Appendix 5

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 305-334

A-51 to    A-55

Appendix 6

VL-1 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 335-350

A-56 to    A-59

ANNEX B

VIKING 2 MORNING PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE CHANGES

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20B%209%20September%202013.pdf

B-1 to B-39

Appendix 1

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 156-175

B-2 to B-5

Appendix 2

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 176-199.

B-6 to B-10

Appendix 3

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 201-260.

B-11 to     B-20

 

Appendix 4

 

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 261-290.

B-21 to     B-26

Appendix 5

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 291-305.

B-27 to     B-30

Appendix 6

VL-2 pressures of .26 to .3 time-bins & .3 and .34 time-bins. Sols 306-361

B-31 to     B-39

ANNEX C

VIKING 2 STUCK PRESSURE GAUGE

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20C%209%20September%202013.pdf

C-1 to C-54

ANNEX D

PERCENT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MEASURED PRESSURES ON VIKING AND GAY-LUSSAC/ AMONTON’S LAW-BASED PREDICTIONS

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20D%20%209%20September%202013.pdf

D-1 to D-171

Appendix 1

Viking 1 Sols 1 to 199

D-3 to D-94

Appendix 2

Viking 1 Sols 200 to 350

D-95 to    D-171

ANNEX E

Measured vs. Predicted Pressure Percent Differences for Viking-1 Time-bins 0.3 and 0.34 http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20E%209%20September%202013.pdf

E-1 to E-14

ANNEX F

Percent Difference Experimental Summary

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20F%20%2010%20SEP%202013.pdf

F-1 to F-18

Appendix 1

Percent Difference Flow Chart for Viking 1 Sols 1 to 116 & 200 to 350

F-5 to F-16

Appendix 2

Histogram with temperatures at successful predictions per time-bins

F-17 to     F-18

ANNEX G

Tavis Transducer Specifications and Test Results

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20G%2010%20September%202013.pdf

G-1 to G-13

 

 

ANNEX H

Calibration Effort for the Mars Pathfinder Tavis Pressure Transducer and IMP Windsock Experiment

http://davidaroffman.com/Annex%20H%20%209%20September%202013.pdf

H-1 to H-43

ANNEX I

Pressures Reported by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS).

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20I%2011%20JUN%202013.pdf

I-1 to I-28

Appendix 1

Print Screen Record of Original REMS Team and Ashima Research MSL Weather Reports

I-12 to I-28

ANNEX J

Concessions by Ashima Research and How to Correctly Calculate Daylight Hours for MSL

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20J%20%209%20September%202013.pdf

J- 1to J-19

ANNEX K

REMS Team and Ashima Research Weather Reports from Sol 15 to Sol 299.

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20K%209%20September%202013.pdf

K-1 to K-34

ANNEX L

How Martian Day Length  Varies with Ls and Latitude

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20L%20July%2014%202014.pdf

L-1 to L-10

ANNEX M

One Year of MSL Weather Reports http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20M%20of%20All%20NASA%20Mars%20Weather%20Data%20Revised%20Aug%2027%202015%20to%20Critiqu.pdf

M-1 to M-38

 

ANNEX N

Weather Reports for MSL Year 2 Ls 151 to Ls 270 (late winter to end of spring), Sols 670 to 864  http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20N.pdf

N-1 to N-13

ANNEX O

Weather Reports for MSL Year 2 Ls 270 to Ls 0  (summer), Sols 865 to 1,020 http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20O.pdf

O-1 to O-11

ANNEX P

Weather Reports for MSL Year 2 Ls 0 to Ls 90  (autumn), Sols 1019 to 1,213 http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20P.pdf

P-1 to P-15

ANNEX Q

Weather Reports for MSL Year 2 to 3 Winter, Ls 90 to Ls 180 (Sols 1,213 to 1,392) http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20Q.pdf

Q-1 to Q-18

ANNEX R

Weather Reports for MSL Year 3 Spring, Ls 180 to Ls 270 (Sols 1,392 to 1,534

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20R%20REVISED.pdf

R-1 to R-37

ANNEX S

Source: Document: Two Martian Years of MSL High Air and Ground Temperatures. http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20S.pdf

S-1 to S41

ANNEX T

Source Document: Two Martian Years of MSL Low Air and Ground Temperatures. http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20T%20TO.pdf

T-1 to T-64

ANNEX U

Comparison of Ultraviolet Radiation and Pressures at Gale Crater, Mars for MSL Years 1 and 2

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20U.pdf

U-1 to U-28

ANNEX V

Weather Reports for MSL Year 3 Summer, Ls 270 to Ls 0 (Sols 1,534 to 1,686. http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20V.pdf

V-1 to V-28

ANNEX W

Weather Reports for MSL Year 3 Fall, Ls 0 to 90 (Sols 1,687 to 1,881

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20W.pdf

W -1 to W-24

ANNEX X

Weather Reports for MSL Year 3-4 Winter, Ls 90 to 180 (Sols 1,881to 2060

http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20X.pdf

X-1 to X-31

ANNEX Y

Weather Reports for MSL Year 4 Spring, 180 to 270  (Sols to 2060 to 2204) http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20Y.pdf

Y-1 to

Y-19

ANNEX Z

Weather Reports for MSL Year 4 Summer, 270 to 0  (Sols to 2203 to 2357) http://davidaroffman.com/ANNEX%20Z.pdf

Z-1 to Z-19

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX A

FIGURE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Martian Time-Bin Clock

A-2

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX F

FIGURE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Prediction success totals per time-bin.

F-1

2

% Differences between measured & predicted pressures as a function of time

F-2

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX G

FIGURE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Tavis pressure sensors tested according to the Alvin Seiff papers

G-1

2

Tavis Viking CAD Diagram 10011

G-2

3

NASA Report No. TM X-74020 (Mitchell Report: Tavis Transducer Tests)

G-3

4

Photo of the Tavis P-4 pressure sensor

G-4

5

Transducer Selection Slide by Professor James E. Tillman

G-6

6

Tavis Pathfinder CAD Diagram 10484

G-7

7

Design diagrams for Tavis transducers (Models P-1, P-2, P-4, P-5, P-6, P-7 and P-8)

G-8

 

8

P-4 Transducers (S/N 1583 and S/N 1591) used for test of Viking pressures sensors after the launch of the two Vikings.

G-9

9

Relative sizes of dust filters used for Tavis and Vaisala transducers.

G-9

10

Table of Characteristics of Tavis transducers (Models P-1, P-2, P-4, P-5, P-6, P-7 & P-8)

G-10

11

Tavis Transducer purchasing information

G-11

12

Temperature Malfunction During (Viking) Cruise Environment

G-13

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX I

FIGURE

TOPIC

PAGE

1

Pressure data for MSL Sols 10.5 to 13

I-1

2

MSL temperature data for Sols 10 to 11.5

I-1

3A

REMS Team and Ashima Research coverage of weather at MSL back in August, 2012, and how Ashima was forced to alter their reports on May 11, 2013.

I-2

3B

REMS Team coverage of weather at MSL back in August, 2012, and how their data was revised again on July 3, 2013.

I-3

4

REMS Weather Booms on MSL

I-5

5

Close up of MSL Weather Booms

I-5

6a to 6d

Temperature and pressure were inversely related for the MSL

I-8

7

Combined VL-1, VL-2, Phoenix and MSL Pressure Curves to MSL at Ls 10

I-9

8

MSL pressure graph Ls 158.8 to 199.9

I-10

6

REMS team and Ashima Research reporting problems

I-12

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX J

 

1

Position of Mars at the start of each of its 12 months.

J-4

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX L

 

1

Changing Martian weather data from the REMS Team.

L-2

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX M

 

1

Pressure changes reported for Sol 370.

M-7

2

Pressure changes for Sols 29 and 30

M-38

3

Who is ordering REMS reports temperature changes?

M-40

4

Weather sensors on MSL Curiosity

M-41

5

VL1-, VL-2, Phoenix and MSL pressure curves

M-43

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX N

 

1

MSL pressure data up through its Sol 866, Ls 270 – start of the second summer at MSL

N-2

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX O

 

1

MSL pressure data up to Ls 270, start of the second summer

O-1

2

MSL Sol 880 data changes after we highlighted problems

O-9

3

MSL Sol 1006 data changes after we highlighted problems

O-10

4

Mistakes and significant data alterations early on cast real doubt on the accuracy or honesty of MSL weather data.

O-11

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX P

 

1

JPL makes changes to Sol 1,119 data that we predicted

P-12

2

MSL Sol 1145 data changes after we highlighted problems

P-13

3

MSL Sol 1160 and 1161 pressures that are record highs and above the 1,150 Pa limit of the Vaisala pressure sensor

P-14

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX S

 

1

Range of high air and ground temperatures through MSL Years 1 and 2.

S-1

2

REMS weather reports published for MSL Sols 1234 to 1241. Note all the ground temperature highs above 0 degrees Celsius and the incredibly low ground temperature at night – down to -100 degrees Celsius on Sol 1241.

S-2

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX U

 

1

UV at MSL in Gale Crater, Mars up through its sol 1021 and the beginning of its second autumn on Mars. The REMS Team/JPL dropped all low values by February, 2016

U-2

2A

The color for UV used on REMS reports.

 

U-20

2B

Dose rate at MSL in micrograys per day related to UV levels published on the REMS reports (see Table 2) for ~300 sols

 

U-20

3A to 3F

Relative positions of Mars and Earth when Low Ultraviolet radiations was originally reported by REMS on Mars.

U-23

4

Stratus clouds seen 1 hours 40 minutes before sunrise at Mars Pathfinder. If the atmosphere there is as thin as NASA claims it is doubtful that there would be light so far before sunrise.

U-24

5

Opportunity turned its rover eyes skyward to observe clouds drifting overhead that look like cirrus clouds on Earth.

 

U-26

6

Solar longitude (Ls) for Mars when MSL Curiosity originally measured very high UV or low UV. Again, after they read this article, they dropped all the low UV values.

U-27

7

UV, Latitude and Altitude

U-28

 

 

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX V

 

 

1

Sol 1553 to 1554 temperature and pressure anomalies and JPL fix after we highlighted the problem with Sol 1554 pressure and max temperatures.

V-23

2

REMS report for Sol 1575.

V-23

3

Figure 3 - The 35 Pa pressure drop and warm low temperatures on Sol 1605 was altered as predicted

V-24

4

Figure 4 – As predicted, odd data for Sol 1610 was altered – in this case totally deleted

V-25

5

Figure 5 - The ground temperature drop for Sol 1640 was not revised. This marked the beginning of strangely cold temperatures that went unchanged.

V-26

6

Figure 6 - Insane variation in night air to ground temperatures between MSL Sols 1643 and 1650

V-27

 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN ANNEX Z

 

1

Original and revised REMS data for MSL Sols 1998 to 2002.

Z-16

2

Sol 2264 weather data seems out of line due to radical changes in temperature, pressure, and UV.

Z-17

3

Puffballs or Hematite? These spheres were seen on Sol 2357.

Z-18

4

Trek map for MSL Curiosity with note on when spheres were seen.

Z-19

LIST OF TABLES IN ANNEX S

 

1

Usually Warm Ground Temperatures Early in the Winter of MSL Year 2

S-2

2

High air and ground temperatures for MSL Years 1 and 2.

S-4 to S-40

 

 


 

LIST OF TABLES IN ANNEX U

 

 

1

UV values for MSL Years 1 and 2 before and after JPL dropped all low UV values

U-1

2

Solar Longitude, Pressures and Ultraviolet Radiation for MSL During its First Two Martian Years.

U-3 to

U-19

3

The relationships (if any) of solar longitude (Ls), lander altitude, lander latitude, day light hours each sol and UV recorded.

U-21

4

15 Sols with low ultraviolet radiation at Gale Crater Mars and the corresponding UV for these dates in Las Vegas, Nevada BEFORE the REMS Team and JPL dropped all low pressure data.

U-24

 

LIST OF TABLES IN ANNEX X

 

1

Original and revised REMS data for MSL Sols 1998 to 2002.

X-29

2

Altitudes around minimum pressure for MSL Year 3

X-30

3

Sol 2043 revised UV

X-31